Jon Stewart


Ph.d., Dr. habil. theol. & phil.
Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University
Foreign member of the Royal Danish Academy of Sciences and Letters

 

Curriculum Vitae Publications Current Projects Papers Given Web Links


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 















 








 


▪ Søren Kierkegaard: Subjectivity, Irony and the Crisis of Modernity
Oxford: Oxford University Press 2015

xv+210pp.


This book is an introductory text that attempts to introduce the thought of Søren Kierkegaard to

first-time readers. At the end of his life Kierkegaard says that the only model that he ever had for his work

was the Greek philosopher Socrates. This work takes this statement by Kierkegaard as its point of departure.

It tries to explore what Kierkegaard meant by this and to show how different aspects of his writing and argumentative strategy can be traced back to Socrates. The main focus is The Concept of Irony, which is a key

text at the beginning of Kierkegaard’s literary career. Although it was an early work, it nevertheless played a determining role in his later development and writings. Indeed, it can be said that in it Kierkegaard laid the
groundwork for much of what would appear in his later famous books such as Either/Or and Fear and Trembling.


________________________


Reviews
“…the book explores, from various angles, this “Socratic Task” as a primary feature of Kierkegaard’s authorship. It is displayed in Kierkegaard’s responses to Danish Hegelianism and Romanticism, and then discussed throughout several chapters in terms of his early authorship, the pseudonymous works, and his post-1846 “second authorship.” Along the way, we are also given various highlights of Kierkegaard’s life, which serve not only to bolster Stewart’s argument, but also provide a fine combination of theoretical exposition and historical biography, which should give the book a broad appeal. As with his previous works, Stewart deftly articulates the connections between Kierkegaard and Hegel, leaving the reader with the helpful realization that, although there are substantial disagreements between the two thinkers, Kierkegaard relied upon—and was far more sympathetic to—Hegel than many scholars have often supposed. …as a broad-brushed account, it leaves this reviewer sufficiently convinced, and regarding the tasks of opening up the general reader to both Kierkegaard’s life and works, and connecting those to important contemporary issues of individuality and social identity, the book succeeds admirably.”

Geoff Dargan, Reading Religion, A Publication of the American Academy of Religion

Read the full review here









La Unidad de la Fenomenología del espirítu de Hegel: Una interpretación sistemática

Translated by Carlos Mendiola Mejía

Mexico City: Universidad Iberoamericana 2014

630pp.


La clave para leer y comprender la Fenomenología del espíritu de Hegel consiste en ser capaz de
identificar correctamente el comienzo y el final de los análisis individuales y los argumentos en el
conglomerado del texto. La mayoría de los estudiantes siempre se sienten abrumados por la oscuridad
del lenguaje de Hegel y son incapaces de distinguir el vago esbozo de un argumento, ya que no están
en posición de reconocer su estructura y las partes que lo componen. Pero una vez que los pasos del
argumento son aclarados, surge el análisis como un todo y llega a ser coherente. Para ayudar al lector,
el autor de esta obra ha dividido el análisis en secciones correspondientes con las secciones de los
argumentos de Hegel y ha seguido el mismo modelo general. El autor invirtió muchos años de su vida
en desarrollar una interpretación de la Fenomenología completa para ofrecer una fuente importante del pensamiento de Hegel a estudiantes y académicos.



 

 

The Cultural Crisis of the Danish Golden Age: Heiberg, Martensen and Kierkegaard
Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press 2015

xx+337pp.

Date of publication: March, 2015
(Danish Golden Age Studies, vol. 9)


The Danish Golden Age spanned a period of time that saw a number of different kinds of crisis: political, economic and cultural. Events such as the French Revolution, the Napoleonic wars, the national bankruptcy in 1813, the Revolution of 1848 and the first Schleswig War radically transformed Danish society. The many changes that took place at this time made it a dynamic period in which artists, poets, philosophers, and religious thinkers were constantly enjoined to reassess the current situation. Some of Denmarks greatest luminaries, such Johan Ludvig Heiberg, Hans Lassen Martensen and Soren Kierkegaard, articulated the nature of the crisis and proposed different solutions to it.


The present work traces the different aspects and dimensions of this crisis by means of a series of case studies. It shows how the perception of the crisis was a kind of spirit that haunted many of the intellectuals and artists of the period. But far from being something negative or destructive, it was a motivating and stimulating force that helped to make the Golden Age what is was. It made artists and thinkers more willing to break with the past and seek new solutions and approaches. Thus it is argued that the crisis can be seen as one of the central defining elements of what we know as Danish Golden Age culture. But the present work is not a purely historical study since it is shown that many of the key elements of the crisis can still be found in our modern world today. Heiberg's diagnosis of the period as suffering from relativism, subjectivism and nihilism sounds strikingly familiar to the modern reader. When seen in this manner, the Danish Golden Age becomes profoundly interesting and relevant for the broad spectrum of problems of modernity.



Reviews

"Stewarts Untersuchungen gehen von der simplen Feststellung aus, dass sich Kierkegaard nicht an den philosophischen Schriften Hegels abarbeitet, sondern in erster Linie an Arbeiten aus seinem dänischen Umfeld, die ihrerseits von Hegel inspiriert sind. Mit dieser feinen Akzentverschiebung gelingt es Stewart, eine der wichtigsten intertextuellen Grundlagen der Kierkegaard-Forschung in Frage zu stellen. … Immer wieder gelingt es Stewart in seiner Studie auf solch überraschende und kontraintuitive Querverbindungen zwischen Kierkegaard und seinen dänischen Zeitgenossen aufmerksam zu machen. Dabei unterstreicht er die Modernität einer umfassenden Krisenerfahrung, die eben nicht nur bei Kierkegaard formuliert wird, sondern auch bei Heiberg und seinen Kritikern. … Insgesamt…handelt es sich um ein sehr lesenswertes Buch, das sich gleichermassen an Kierkegaard-Forscher sowie am Dänischen Guldalder interessierte Literatur- und Kulturwissenschaftler richtet."
Klaus Müller-Wille (Universität Zürich), Orbis Litteratum, vol. 71, no. 4, 2016, pp. 435-436.

________________________

Claus Møller Jørgensen, "The Cultural Crisis of the Danish Golden Age - Heiberg, Martensen and Kierkegaard," BogFeature, 23 November, 2015. http://www.historie-online.dk/nyt/bogfeature/b20154805.htm


________________________


“Jon Stewart viser, at det giver god mening at åbne historiske tekster op ved at læse dem i sammenhæng med andre samtidige tekster som de direkte eller—som ofte er tilfældet her—indirekte refererer til og er i dialog med. Ud af det kommer der overbevisende, men også meget tekstnære og detaljerede analyser af afgrænsede problemstillinger.”
Claus Møller Jørgensen, "The Cultural Crisis of the Danish Golden Age - Heiberg, Martensen and Kierkegaard," BogFeature, 23 November, 2015.

 


 

The Unity of Content and Form in Philosophical Writing:

The Perils of Conformity
New York et al.: Bloomsbury Publishing 2013
x+220pp.

 

In The Unity of Content and Form in Philosophical Writing, Jon Stewart argues that there is a close relation between content and form in philosophical writing. While this might seem obvious at first glance, it is overlooked in the current climate of Anglophone academic philosophy, which, Stewart contends, accepts only a single genre as proper for philosophical expression. Stewart demonstrates the uniformity of today's philosophical writing by contrasting it with that of the past.

Taking specific texts from the history of philosophy and literature as case studies, Stewart shows how the use of genres like dialogues, plays and short stories were an entirely suitable and effective means of presenting and arguing for philosophical positions given the concrete historical and cultural contexts in which they appeared.

Now, Stewart argues, the prevailing intolerance means that the same texts are dismissed as unphilosophical merely due to their form, although their content is, in fact, profoundly philosophical. The book’s challenge to current conventions of philosophical is provocative and timely, and will be of great interest to students and scholars of philosophy, literature and history.


Reviews

“Jon Stewart's impressive erudition illuminates the mosaic of philosophical writing's diverse forms and styles against the backdrop of the history of philosophy and its occasional cross-pollination with literary form. From Plato to Rorty, Lessing to Borges, Seneca to Sartre, The Unity of Content and Form in Philosophical Writing directs our attention to the dialectical relationship between the content of form and the form of content. The result is at once a harsh indictment of form and style in contemporary Anglo-American philosophy and a celebration of that tradition's rich potential. Like Søren Kierkegaard's pseudonym Vigilius Haufniensis, Stewart is a watchman: his book warns of the dangers of conformity and bears witness to the abundant and varied tools of written philosophical expression, the manifold of which may just be one of philosophy's greatest truths.”

J.D. Mininger, Associate Professor of Social and Political Theory at Vytautas Magnus University, Kaunas, Lithuania


________________________



“Jon Stewart mobilizes the history of philosophy with its various modes of writing against external and internal limitations, caused by institutional conventions or presupposed concepts of science – pointing to and exemplifying impressively the relation between philosophy and literature, which does not affect each characteristic, but rather ensures philosophy’s vitality.”

Dr. Markus Kleinert, Max Weber Center for Advanced Cultural and Social Studies, University of Erfurt, Germany



________________________



"Jon Stewart’s book is a fascinating and thought-provoking study of the relationship between the content of philosophical works and the form in which they are expressed. Stewart argues that the homogeneity of the currently received forms of philosophical expression -- the journal article and its extended form, the monograph -- stands in stark contrast with the diverse forms of expression that philosophical writing has taken throughout its history….Stewart’s book provides much needed reflection on the nature of philosophical writing that raises important and pressing questions about the nature and practices of the discipline."
Keith Allen, Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews, 2014.03.17




 



Idealism and Existentialism: Hegel and Nineteenth-
and Twentieth-Century European Philosophy

New York and London: Continuum International Publishing 2010
xv+282pp.


The history of Continental philosophy is often conceived as being represented by two major schools: German idealism and phenomenology/existentialism. These two schools are frequently juxtaposed so as to highlight their purported radical differences. There is a commonly held view that an abrupt break occurred in the Nineteenth Century, resulting in a disdainful rejection of idealism in all its forms. This break is often located in the transition from Hegel to Kierkegaard. The history of philosophy in the first half of the nineteenth century has thus been read as a grand confrontation between the overambitious rationalistic system of Hegel and the devastating criticisms of it by Kierkegaard’s philosophy of existence.

This work aims to undermine this popular view of the radical break between idealism and existentialism by means of a series of detailed studies in specific episodes of European thought. As a whole, this book represents an important attempt to demonstrate the long shadow cast by Kant and Hegel over the subsequent history of European thought.

 

Reviews

“While I disagree with Stewart's landing place for Kierkegaard via Hegel, Stewart rigorously opens up discussion about the historical reception of these figures—integral as they are to his grander thesis at large—and provokes many significant questions about their respective definitions of ‘reason’ and ‘truth’ as well as the edification process that results from raising these questions. Idealism and Existentialism should be read by anyone interested in the history of the reception of Hegel, Kierkegaard, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Sartre and Merleau-Ponty. Because Stewart persists throughout his writings at a counter-intuitive level for those trained in this history, his work deserves much credit for the means it employs to challenge our preconceptions. The reader is forced to think about ‘reason’ in many of its iterations throughout the rich history of late modern European philosophy. Since Stewart does not give a unitary solution to the problem of what reason is, the reader is left to build a new definition in an attempt to grasp this previous philosophical epoch, all the while thinking about how this ever expanding, multivalent notion of reason could fit into a ‘system.’ It is in this way that Stewart's reading of Hegel has truly succeeded.”
Marcia Morgan, Søren Kierkegaard Newsletter, no. 58, November 2011, pp. 11-15.


________________________


"Stewart's fresh approach to the so-called 'antagonism' between idealism and existentialism is both welcome and edifying. His careful, nuanced scholarship encourages the reader to re-consider and re-evaluate the major debates that shaped the development of European philosophy in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries."
Daniel Conway, Texas A&M University

________________________


"Jon Stewart's book Idealism and Existentialism is a refreshing antidote to the many short-sighted readings of European philosophy that define existentialism by its radical rejection of Hegel….Stewart's analyses offer a rich montage of perspectives on some of the most pivotal concerns in European thought…Stewart's scholarship is impressive, written in a clear and direct prose that avoids unnecessary jargon, while his essays drill down to unearth substantial issues at the heart of both Hegel and the early development of existentialism. What is more, his essays are very well-researched, especially those on Hegel, displaying a familiarity with a wide range of scholarly debates and key scholarly sources. Provided one is interested in learning about the structural complexity of Hegel's Phenomenology, as well as about Hegel's relationship to the early development of existentialist themes in Kierkegaard and Nietzsche, readers will be well-served in reading Stewart's book."
Jason J. Howard, Hegel Bulletin, vol. 33, issue 1, 2012, pp. 122-127.


 

 


A History of Hegelianism in Golden Age Denmark
Tome I: The Heiberg Period: 1824-1836
Copenhagen: C.A. Reitzel’s Publishing House 2007
xxi+629pp.
(
Danish Golden Age Studies, vol. 3, Tome I)

 

The present tome is the first of a three-volume work dedicated to exploring the profound influence of G.W.F. Hegel’s philosophical thinking in Golden Age Denmark. This initial volume covers the period from the beginning of the Hegel reception in the Danish Kingdom in the 1820s until 1836.

The dominant figure from this period is the poet and critic Johan Ludvig Heiberg. While Søren Kierkegaard’s polemic with the Danish Hegelians is well-known, the actual texts and ideas of these thinkers have received little attention in their own right.

The present work demonstrates that this largely overlooked tradition of Hegel reception played a profound and indeed constitutive role in many aspects of Golden Age culture: philosophy, theology, literature, poetry, law, journalism, the arts, etc. Moreover, it brought into its orbit most all of the main figures from the period.

 

 

Reviews


“Das Buch zeichnet sich aus durch eine virtuose und akribische Materialkenntnis der dänischen Hegelrezeption. Ein solches Buch kann man nur schreiben nach jahrzehntelanger Arbeit am Thema."
Helmut Schneider, Hegel-Studien, vol. 46, 2011, p. 279.


________________________



“This is the first of three ‘tomes’ of Jon Stewart’s Habilitationsschrift in philosophy at the University of Copenhagen; the second concerns The Martensen Period: 1837-1842, and the third Kierkegaard and the Left-Hegelian-Period: 1842-1860. Together they make up volume 3 of Stewart’s series Danish Golden Age Studies. Their purpose is ‘to put forth the basic information about the Danish Hegel reception in a clear and readable fashion.’ Such information needs to be put forth because, unlike Hegel’s reception throughout the rest of Europe and beyond, Danish Hegelianism remains largely but unjustly neglected in scholarly circles…. [R]eaders will appreciate Stewart’s tireless and productive labors, both here and elsewhere, to illuminate this neglected but important area of European thought.”

Paul Vincent Spade, Journal of the History of Philosophy, vol. 41, no. 1, January 2009, pp. 150-151.

 

________________________
 

“This is a large-scale undertaking and a work rich in perspectives since it gives us a somewhat different picture of the contemporary age which formed Søren Kierkegaard…. It is a more panoramic, dynamic and open picture that Stewart’s treatise sketches of Danish thinking in this period—a picture that helps us to understand why there would also have been a philosophical Golden Age even without Kierkegaard, however shocking that might seem.”

Lasse Horne Kjældgaard, Politiken, February 9, 2008, section “Bøger,” p. 13.

 

________________________

 

“The work…is the first extensive presentation, in either the Danish research world or the international research world, of a series of texts that together constitute a central line in the intellectual life of the Danish Golden Age. The author argues that not a few of these texts represent original contributions to the age’s philosophical discussions. Not least of all the international research into Søren Kierkegaard’s universe of thought will be able to make use of the material that the author presents and the conclusions he draws…. This is an impressive work based on extensive knowledge of the texts of the Danish Golden Age and those relevant for Hegel’s thought. The author aims at exhaustiveness, not least of all with the bibliographical work. He brings forth a series of figures, both large and less significant, from the period treated, whose written works display a familiarity with Hegel’s philosophy, or in which Hegel is at least referred to….No future work on the Danish Golden Age and its leading figures will be able to pass by the results that the author has achieved…. The author with his treatise has demonstrated significant scholarly insight and maturity and has moved research into the Danish Golden Age a large step forward….There can be no doubt that his work will influence both the Danish and the international Kierkegaard research for a long time to come.”
Carl Henrik Koch, University of Copenhagen


 

 

 



A History of Hegelianism in Golden Age Denmark
Tome II: The Martensen Period: 1837-1842
Copenhagen: C.A. Reitzel’s Publishing House 2007
xx+775pp.
(
Danish Golden Age Studies, vol. 3, Tome II)

 

This second tome treats the most dynamic period in the history of the Danish Hegel reception, namely, the years from 1837 to 1842. The main figure in this period is the theologian Hans Lassen Martensen who made Hegel’s philosophy a sensation among the students at the University of Copenhagen in the late 1830s.

This period also includes the publication of Johan Ludvig Heiberg’s Hegelian journal, Perseus, in 1837 and 1838, and the monumental review of it by Frederik Christian Sibbern. During this time Hegel’s philosophy flourished in unlikely genres such as drama, with Heiberg’s speculative comedy, Fata Morgana (1838), and lyric poetry with his New Poems (1841), which included his satirical classic, “A Soul after Death.” This period also witnessed Hegel’s philosophy make inroads in fields such as jurisprudence and art criticism. During these years Hegelianism enjoyed an unprecedented success in Denmark that began to fade as it gradually became perceived as a dangerous trend.

 


 

Jon Stewart, Kierkegaard's Relation to Hegel Reconsidered


 

Kierkegaard’s Relations to Hegel Reconsidered
New York: Cambridge University Press 2003
xix+695pp.
 

This is a study of the complex relations between the philosophies of Kierkegaard and Hegel. The standard view on the subject is that Kierkegaard defined himself as explicitly anti-Hegelian, indeed, that he viewed Hegel’s philosophy with disdain. However, Kierkegaard’s criticism was not so much of Hegel as of a number of contemporary Danish Hegelians. Kierkegaard’s own view of Hegel was in fact much more positive than has been generally recognized.

 

 

Reviews
“Jon Stewart’s Kierkegaards Relations to Hegel Reconsidered is an outstanding and original scholarly achievement which will forever change the simplistic and widely shared stereotype of Kierkegaard as a lifelong, implacable, knee-jerk opponent of Hegel....In his eye-opening study Stewart takes us beyond the sterility of a relation of absolute, mutual negation between Kierkegaard and Hegel and demonstrates beyond dispute the many ways in which Kierkegaard was influenced not only negatively, but even more important, positively by Hegel. Kierkegaard borrowed and adapted arguments and methodology from the great German philosopher, not only during his early years but throughout his entire career.”
Bruce H. Kirmmse, Connecticut College

 

________________________


“...a major achievement in contemporary Kierkegaard scholarship....As Stewart points out, the relationship between Kierkegaard and Hegel has been a common topic of comment in general histories of nineteenth-century thought, and the book will therefore be of interest beyond the world of those taking or conducting course in Kierkegaard's thought.”
George Pattison, Oxford University

 

________________________ 

 

“Stewart untersucht Kierkegaards Verhältnis zu Hegel vor dem Hintergrund der akribisch rekonstuierten dänischen Hegel-Rezeption, wodurch der für jede Darstellung Kierkegaardschen Philosophierens zentrale Vergleich mit Hegels ‘System der Wissenschaft’ aus einer neuen Perspektive betrachtet wird…. Stewarts Methode und die damit erzielten Ergebnisse [stellen] eine wesentliche Korrektur und Ergänzung der…Forschung [dar].... Die außergewöhnliche Leistung der Arbeit ist die Methode der Kontextualisierung, also die Rekonstruktion der dänischen Hegel-Rezeption und der Nachweis von Kierkegaards intensiver Anteilnahme daran.”

Markus Kleinert, Philosophische Rundschau, Band 54, Heft 3, 2007, pp. 255-262.

 

________________________

“The ultimate goal of the work is to take up critically the superficial opposition of Hegel and Kierkegaard which runs through many accounts of the history of philosophy. The standard view, which Thulstrup canonized, presented a linear interpretation of the history of European philosophy after Kant, which could thus be divided into two main paths: on the one hand, Hegel and systematic, completed philosophy, and on the other, Kierkegaard’s philosophy, which is deeply concerned with existence and therefore cannot be completed by abstract thought…. While Hegel and Kierkegaard are often so neatly and symmetrically juxtaposed to one another, there are many more facets of Kierkegaard’s historical relation to Hegel, which Stewart has now demonstrated more extensively than anyone else before. It is to be hoped that his book will be read just as much as Thulstrup’s was. It is an achievement that deserves it.”

Lasse Horne Kjældgaard, Politiken, February 28, 2004, section 4, p. 7.

 

________________________

“It is rare to find a scholarly book that treats its topic exhaustively. But Jon Stewart’s 658-page Kierkegaard’s Relations to Hegel Reconsidered, despite its author’s disclaimers, comes close. It is an impressive attempt to demolish what Stewart calls ‘the standard view,’ using a three-part argument: that Hegel exerted a substantial positive influence on the young Kierkegaard; that Kierkegaard was never the radical critic of Hegel claimed by the ‘standard view’; and that most Kierkegaard scholars…have been led astray on these matters by their ignorance of Kierkegaard’s philosophical milieu and their ideological bias…. Kierkegaard’s Relations to Hegel Reconsidered is an ambitious project, an impressive achievement and a valuable resource for Kierkegaard scholars…. It should generate a new wave of scholarship on the Hegel-Kierkegaard relation(s).”

Stephen N. Dunning, Journal of the History of Philosophy, vol. 42, no. 2, 2004, pp. 500-502.

 

________________________

“The product of prodigious research, this volume is of enormous help in placing Kierkegaard in his immediate, Danish intellectual milieu. Stewart has put us greatly in his debt. He examines in great detail the relation of Kierkegaard’s writings to contemporary discussions among the Danish ‘Hegelians’ and ‘anti-Hegelians.’ ”

Merold Westphal, Søren Kierkegaard Newsletter, no. 48, September 2004, pp. 10-15.

 

________________________
 

“After reading Kierkegaard’s Relations to Hegel Reconsidered, one has to acknowledge both its irrefragable value and the future stir it will provoke in contemporary Kierkegaard scholarship. I limit myself to four major contributions: 1) the more accurate understanding of the intellectual and theological context of Kierkegaard’s thought. In this sense, we have to notice Stewart’s outlines of the philosophical views of the four major Hegelian figures in Golden Age Denmark (Martensen, Heiberg, Grundtvig and Adler), and other explanatory clarifications about the important opponents of Hegelianism (Sibbern, Mynster, and Møller, who actually inspired Kierkegaard). 2) Kierkegaard’s Relations to Hegel Reconsidered offers a very insightful, abundantly documented, and precise depiction of the ‘palimpsest’ relation between Kierkegaard and Hegel, the major conclusion being that the former made a very creative use of some Hegelian philosophical terms or methods, but adapted them to his own project, which was, in several senses, radically different from that of Hegel. 3) Given Stewart’s interesting analysis and its original results in connection with The Sickness unto Death, one cannot ignore any longer the presence of Hegelian dialectical phenomenology in Kierkegaard’s analysis of despair …. 4) The fundamental implications of Stewart’s conclusions on the history of 19th-century philosophy, whose traditional structure of two parallel patterns of thinking (rational vs. irrational, mind vs. existence) must be seriously revised. In this sense, Stewart warns us, the role that the ‘petty’ Danish Hegelians have played in the encounter between the two great thinkers might have had rather dramatic repercussions on the tumultuous history of European thought.”
Leo Stan, Archaeus. Studies in History of Religions, vol. 8, 2004, no. 3-4, pp. 235-262.


________________________



"This brilliant study, of more than seven hundred pages, casts a new light on this complex relationship and reveals that most of Kierkegaard’s critical remarks that were thought to relate to Hegel are in fact critical of a number of contemporary Danish Hegelians."
Toni Renić, Hegel-Jahbuch, vol. 19, no. 1, 2013, p. 262.

 

 




The Unity of Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit:
A Systematic Interpretation

Evanston, Illinois: Northwestern University Press 2000 (Paperback, 2011)
xv+556pp.

 

Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit is considered by many to be the most difficult book in the philosophical canon. While some authors have published excellent essays on various chapters and aspects of the book, few authors have successfully tackled the whole. In The Unity of Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit, Jon Stewart interprets Hegel’s work as a dialectical transformation of Kantian transcendental philosophy, providing from this unified standpoint a case for Hegel’s own conception of philosophy as a system. In restoring them to their larger systematic contexts, Stewart clarifies Hegel’s individual analyses, as well as indicating the meaning and significance of the transitions and illustrating the parallelisms between the respective analyses.

 

Many of Hegel’s main themes—universal-particular, mediacy-immediacy—are traced through the text, demonstrating Hegel’s formal continuity. By examining at the microlevel the particulars of each dialectical movement, and by analyzing at the macrolevel the role of the argument in question in the context of the work as a whole, Stewart provides a detailed analysis of the Phenomenology and a significant scholarly demonstration of Hegel’s own conception of the Phenomenology as a part of a systematic philosophy.

 


Reviews

In his study, The Unity of Hegels Phenomenology of Spirit: A Systematic Interpretation, Jon Stewart not only analyzes Hegel’s Phenomenology in chapter-by-chapter fashion but he also provides a compelling argument as to why even individual sections of the book can only be interpreted in the context of the unity of the work as a whole....Perhaps most important is Stewart's view of Hegels notion of Absolute Knowing, the last section of the Phenomenology. Eschewing theological or metaphysical interpretations or interpretations according to which history comes to an end or some type of divine knowledge is attained, Stewart impressively argues that, for Hegel, absolute knowing means that self-consciousness has finally arrived at the point at which all of the conditions for cognition have been unpacked and that self-consciousness sees these conditions in their necessary systematic and developmental unity.”
Andrew Kelley, Journal of the History of Philosophy, vol. 39, no. 4, October 2001, pp. 597-600.


________________________

“An Einführungen, Kommentaren und monographischen Darstellungen zur Phänomenologie des Geistes mangelt es nicht; Jon Stewarts einläßliche und umfangreiche Gesamtinterpretation des Werks darf dennoch nicht nur für den angloamerikanischen Raum…den Anspruch erheben, einem Desiderat abzuhelfen. Zwar darf der Text auch als Resultat und in manchen kritische Revision langjähriger Studien des Autors zur Phänomenologie des Geistes gelten, entstanden aber ist vor allem ein Arbeitsbuch, das in Text naher Deutung und begrifflicher Präzision über die Intention, ‘a simple yet thorough and accurate introduction...for the average undergraduate’ zu liefern, weit hinausreicht.”

Heinrich Clairmont, Hegel-Studien, Band 36, 2001, pp. 301-302.

 

________________________

“This is an ambitious book that has two stated objectives: ‘1) to provide a detailed analysis of the Phenomenology that would be accessible to most intermediate students and non-specialists; and 2) to make plausible Hegel’s own conception of the Phenomenology as a part of a systematic philosophy’ (Stewart, 1). After providing some background on Hegel’s life and works and a brief description of Kantian philosophy, Stewart proceeds to give a detailed account of each chapter in Hegel’s book, presenting the case that Hegel’s argument is a classical ‘transcendental argument’ (i.e., a deduction of the necessary conditions of consciousness from which we obtain knowledge). Hegel’s argument should be seen as an emendation of Kant’s cognitive metaphysics…. Stewart provides…a complete and readable commentary in English, and he does an admirable job in defending the idea that Hegel is a systematic philosopher who actually knows how to construct conceptual relations. His analysis challenges work by those such as Charles Taylor and Robert Solomon, who believe that Hegel’s logical project is either incoherent (Taylor) or just romantic fancy (Solomon). Stewart’s work shows why these other interpreters have misunderstood the development of the philosophical concept.”

Daniel Edward Shannon, Philosophy in Review, vol. 21, no. 5, October 2001, pp. 378-380.

 

________________________

“G.W.F. Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit is both a major work in the history of philosophy and notoriously difficult to penetrate…. Stewart does exceptionally well at making the Phenomenology far more accessible for those unfamiliar with Hegel’s dense terminology. After some introductory remarks about Hegel’s life and philosophical legacy, Stewart moves slowly, section by section, from Hegel’s introduction in the Phenomenology through to its completion…. This volume takes the form of a useful commentary regularly utilizing original tables, which I found particularly illuminating. Stewart addresses each and every sub-section of the Phenomenology in order, painstakingly offering three things. First, Stewart presents a brief introduction to how the section fits into Hegel’s philosophical picture. Next, Stewart offers an explication of the key developmental transitions within each subsection, focusing foremost on the development of the Notion. In so doing, he breaks the chapter down into one to five or so paragraphs and explains Hegel’s argumentation. Third, Stewart ends each sub-section with a brief conclusion reviewing key transitions of the sub-section as a whole and the direction these transitions point towards. Some of these explications are of particular use and novelty, such as his discussion of Hegel’s comments on the French Revolution and the subsequent Terror (see pp. 349–56). Any student struggling with all or part of Hegel’s Phenomenology will no doubt greatly benefit from what is by and large a superb work…. The great strength of this volume is its ability to interpret Hegel’s many obscure passages clearly and concisely in a relaxed and easy-going manner. I have no doubt that all serious students of Hegel’s Phenomenology will come to rely on Stewart’s excellent interpretation for some time to come.”

Thom Brooks, International Journal of Philosophical Studies, vol. 11, no. 4, 2003, pp. 489-491.


 

 

 









 


Anthologies Edited



A Companion to Kierkegaard
Malden, MA, Oxford, and Chichester:
Blackwell Publishing Ltd. 2015.
(Blackwell Companions to Philosophy)


Søren Kierkegaard is a highly complex author who spans a handful of disciplines. Claimed equally by philosophers, theologians, and literary scholars, he continues to exercise an enormous interest internationally. The Companion to Kierkegaard offers the best single-volume overview of Kierkegaard studies available today. The volume is divided into four major sections that reflect the main areas of Kierkegaard studies today: I. Philosophy, II. Theology and Religious Studies, III. Aesthetics and the Arts, and IV. Social Sciences and Politics. Moreover, in order to cover in a systematic manner each of these disciplinary areas, the volume further subdivides these categories into three subsections: A. Sources, B. Reception and C. Concepts and Contributions. This organization allows for the presentation of all the major aspects of the broad field of Kierkegaard research. Although written by specialists, this volume will constitute a major a reference work for students, instructors, and general readers.




Kierkegaard Secondary Literature
Tome VI: Portuguese, Romanian, Russian, Slovak, Spanish, and Swedish
London and New York: Routledge 2016
xix+327pp.
(Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 18)

In recent years interest in the thought of Kierkegaard has grown dramatically, and with it the body of secondary literature has expanded so quickly that it has become impossible for even the most conscientious scholar to
keep pace. The problem of the explosion of secondary literature is made more acute by the fact that much of
what is written about Kierkegaard appears in languages that most Kierkegaard scholars do not know.
Kierkegaard has become a global phenomenon, and new research traditions have emerged in different
languages, countries and regions.

The present volume is dedicated to trying to help, in some small part, to resolve these two problems in
Kierkegaard studies. Its purpose is, first, to provide book reviews of some of the leading monographic
studies in the Kierkegaard secondary literature so as to assist the community of scholars to become familiar
with the works that they have not read for themselves. The aim is thus to offer students and scholars of
Kierkegaard a comprehensive survey of works that have played a more or less significant role in the research. Second, the present volume also tries to make accessible many works in the Kierkegaard secondary literature
that are written in the different languages and thus to give a glimpse into different and lesser-known research
traditions.

Tome VI of the present volume presents reviews of works written in Portuguese, Romanian, Russian, Slovak, Spanish, and Swedish.





Kierkegaard Secondary Literature
Tome V: Greek, Hebrew, Hungarian, Italian, Japanese, Norwegian, and Polish
London and New York: Routledge 2016
xix+324pp.
(Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 18)

In recent years interest in the thought of Kierkegaard has grown dramatically, and with it the body of secondary literature has expanded so quickly that it has become impossible for even the most conscientious scholar to
keep pace. The problem of the explosion of secondary literature is made more acute by the fact that much of
what is written about Kierkegaard appears in languages that most Kierkegaard scholars do not know.
Kierkegaard has become a global phenomenon, and new research traditions have emerged in different
languages, countries and regions.

The present volume is dedicated to trying to help, in some small part, to resolve these two problems in
Kierkegaard studies. Its purpose is, first, to provide book reviews of some of the leading monographic
studies in the Kierkegaard secondary literature so as to assist the community of scholars to become familiar
with the works that they have not read for themselves. The aim is thus to offer students and scholars of
Kierkegaard a comprehensive survey of works that have played a more or less significant role in the research. Second, the present volume also tries to make accessible many works in the Kierkegaard secondary literature
that are written in the different languages and thus to give a glimpse into different and lesser-known research
traditions.

Tome V of the present volume presents reviews of works written in Hebrew, Hungarian, Italian, Japanese, Norwegian, and Polish.






Kierkegaard Secondary Literature
Tome IV: Finnish, French, Galician, and German
London and New York: Routledge 2016
xviii+331pp.
(Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 18)

In recent years interest in the thought of Kierkegaard has grown dramatically, and with it the body of secondary literature has expanded so quickly that it has become impossible for even the most conscientious scholar to
keep pace. The problem of the explosion of secondary literature is made more acute by the fact that much of
what is written about Kierkegaard appears in languages that most Kierkegaard scholars do not know.
Kierkegaard has become a global phenomenon, and new research traditions have emerged in different
languages, countries and regions.

The present volume is dedicated to trying to help, in some small part, to resolve these two problems in
Kierkegaard studies. Its purpose is, first, to provide book reviews of some of the leading monographic
studies in the Kierkegaard secondary literature so as to assist the community of scholars to become familiar
with the works that they have not read for themselves. The aim is thus to offer students and scholars of
Kierkegaard a comprehensive survey of works that have played a more or less significant role in the research. Second, the present volume also tries to make accessible many works in the Kierkegaard secondary literature
that are written in the different languages and thus to give a glimpse into different and lesser-known research
traditions.

Tome IV of the present volume presents reviews of works written in Finnish, French, Galician, and German.




 
Kierkegaard Secondary Literature
Tome III: English, L-Z
London and New York: Routledge 2016
xx+323pp.
(Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 18)

In recent years interest in the thought of Kierkegaard has grown dramatically, and with it the body of secondary literature has expanded so quickly that it has become impossible for even the most conscientious scholar to
keep pace. The problem of the explosion of secondary literature is made more acute by the fact that much of
what is written about Kierkegaard appears in languages that most Kierkegaard scholars do not know.
Kierkegaard has become a global phenomenon, and new research traditions have emerged in different
languages, countries and regions.

The present volume is dedicated to trying to help, in some small part, to resolve these two problems in
Kierkegaard studies. Its purpose is, first, to provide book reviews of some of the leading monographic
studies in the Kierkegaard secondary literature so as to assist the community of scholars to become familiar
with the works that they have not read for themselves. The aim is thus to offer students and scholars of
Kierkegaard a comprehensive survey of works that have played a more or less significant role in the research. Second, the present volume also tries to make accessible many works in the Kierkegaard secondary literature
that are written in the different languages and thus to give a glimpse into different and lesser-known research
traditions.

Tome III of the present volume presents the second half of the reviews of works written in English.





Kierkegaard Secondary Literature
Tome II: English, A-K
Aldershot: Ashgate 2016
xix+349pp.
(Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 18)

In recent years interest in the thought of Kierkegaard has grown dramatically, and with it the body of secondary literature has expanded so quickly that it has become impossible for even the most conscientious scholar to
keep pace. The problem of the explosion of secondary literature is made more acute by the fact that much of
what is written about Kierkegaard appears in languages that most Kierkegaard scholars do not know.
Kierkegaard has become a global phenomenon, and new research traditions have emerged in different
languages, countries and regions.

The present volume is dedicated to trying to help, in some small part, to resolve these two problems in
Kierkegaard studies. Its purpose is, first, to provide book reviews of some of the leading monographic
studies in the Kierkegaard secondary literature so as to assist the community of scholars to become familiar
with the works that they have not read for themselves. The aim is thus to offer students and scholars of
Kierkegaard a comprehensive survey of works that have played a more or less significant role in the research. Second, the present volume also tries to make accessible many works in the Kierkegaard secondary literature
that are written in the different languages and thus to give a glimpse into different and lesser-known research
traditions.

Tome II of the present volume presents the first half of the reviews of works written in English.




Kierkegaard Secondary Literature
Tome I: Catalan, Chinese, Czech, Danish and Dutch
Aldershot: Ashgate 2016
xxv+276pp.
(Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 18)

In recent years interest in the thought of Kierkegaard has grown dramatically, and with it the body of secondary literature has expanded so quickly that it has become impossible for even the most conscientious scholar to
keep pace. The problem of the explosion of secondary literature is made more acute by the fact that much of
what is written about Kierkegaard appears in languages that most Kierkegaard scholars do not know.
Kierkegaard has become a global phenomenon, and new research traditions have emerged in different
languages, countries and regions.

The present volume is dedicated to trying to help, in some small part, to resolve these two problems in
Kierkegaard studies. Its purpose is, first, to provide book reviews of some of the leading monographic
studies in the Kierkegaard secondary literature so as to assist the community of scholars to become familiar
with the works that they have not read for themselves. The aim is thus to offer students and scholars of
Kierkegaard a comprehensive survey of works that have played a more or less significant role in the research. Second, the present volume also tries to make accessible many works in the Kierkegaard secondary literature
that are written in the different languages and thus to give a glimpse into different and lesser-known research
traditions.

Tome I of the present volume presents reviews of works written in Catalan, Chinese, Czech, Danish, and Dutch.


 


 

  Kierkegaard's Influence on Literature, Criticism and Art
Tome V: The Romance Languages, Central and Eastern Europe
Aldershot: Ashgate 2013
xiii+207pp.
(Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 12)

 

While Kierkegaard is primarily known as a philosopher or religious thinker, his writings have also been used extensively by literary writers, critics and artists. This use can be traced in the work of major cultural figures not just in Denmark and Scandinavia but also in the wider world. These later figures have been attracted to Kierkegaard due to a number of reasons, for example, his creative mixing of genres, his complex use of pseudonyms, his rhetoric and literary style, and his rich images, parables, and allegories. The goal of the present volume is to document this influence in the different language groups and traditions.

Tome V treats the work of a heterogeneous group of writers from the Romance languages and from Central and Eastern Europe who have made use of Kierkegaard in their writings. Kierkegaard has been particularly important for Spanish literature: the Argentine writers Jorge Luis Borges, Leonardo Castellani, and Ernesto Sábato, the Mexican writer Carlos Fuentes, and the Spanish essayist and philosopher María Zambrano were all inspired to varying degrees by him. The Dane also appears in the works of authors writing in other Romance languages, such as the Romanian writer Max Blecher. The Portuguese author Fernando Pessoa was almost certainly inspired by Kierkegaard’s use of pseudonyms. Kierkegaard has also been read by very diverse literary figures from Central and Eastern Europe. He appears in the novels of the contemporary Hungarian authors Péter Nadas and Péter Esterházy. With regard to the Slavic languages, the famous Russian writer, thinker, literary critic, Mikhail Bakhtin, was also inspired by Kierkegaard as was the Polish writer Witold Gombrowicz and the Czech novelist Ivan Klíma. The Polish-born Israeli novelist Pinhas Sadeh was interested in Kierkegaard’s treatment of the story of Abraham and Isaac in Fear and Trembling.



 


 

Kierkegaard's Influence on Literature, Criticism and Art
Tome IV: The Anglophone World
Aldershot: Ashgate 2013
xv+239pp.
(Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 12)

 

While Kierkegaard is primarily known as a philosopher or religious thinker, his writings have also been used extensively by literary writers, critics and artists. This use can be traced in the work of major cultural figures not just in Denmark and Scandinavia but also in the wider world. These later figures have been attracted to Kierkegaard due to a number of reasons, for example, his creative mixing of genres, his complex use of pseudonyms, his rhetoric and literary style, and his rich images, parables, and allegories. The goal of the present volume is to document this influence in the different language groups and traditions.

Tome IV examines Kierkegaard’s surprisingly extensive influence in the Anglophone world of literature and art. Kierkegaard’s presence has been especially strong in the United States. His thought appears in the work of the novelists Walker Percy, James Baldwin, Flannery O’Conner, William Styron, Don Delillo, and Louise Erdrich. He has also been used by the famous American literary critics, George Steiner and Harold Bloom. The American composer Samuel Barber made use of Kierkegaard in his musical works. Kierkegaard has also exercised an influence on British and Irish letters. The English-born poet W.H. Auden sought in Kierkegaard ideas for his poetic works, and the contemporary English novelist David Lodge has written a novel Therapy, in which Kierkegaard plays an important role. Cryptic traces of Kierkegaard can also be found.


 

 



Kierkegaard's Influence on Literature, Criticism and Art
Tome III: Sweden and Norway
Aldershot: Ashgate 2013
xiii+202pp.
(Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 12)

 

While Kierkegaard is primarily known as a philosopher or religious thinker, his writings have also been used extensively by literary writers, critics and artists. This use can be traced in the work of major cultural figures not just in Denmark and Scandinavia but also in the wider world. These later figures have been attracted to Kierkegaard due to a number of reasons, for example, his creative mixing of genres, his complex use of pseudonyms, his rhetoric and literary style, and his rich images, parables, and allegories. The goal of the present volume is to document this influence in the different language groups and traditions.

Tome III investigates the works of Swedish and Norwegian writers and artists who have been inspired by Kierkegaard. In Sweden the novelist Victoria Benedictsson made use of Kierkegaard during the period of the so-called Modern Breakthrough. Similarly, the celebrated playwright August Strindberg found inspiration in Kierkegaard. Later Swedish writers right up to our own day have continued to draw on his thought. This includes figures such as Selma Lagerlöf, Lars Ahlin, Lars Gyllensten, and Carl-Henning Wijkmark. The Norwegian reception of Kierkegaard also began remarkably early and was shaped by the leading names in Norwegian cultural life. The famous dramatist and poet Henrik Ibsen, despite his coy responses to questions about his relation to Kierkegaard, clearly seems to have been inspired by the Dane in famous works such as Brand. The other great Norwegian national writer and poet Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson, who was influenced by the Modern Breakthrough movement, was also deeply inspired by Kierkegaard. Finally, the celebrated Norwegian artist Edvard Munch (1863-1944) closely studied key Kierkegaardian concepts such as anxiety, and this influence is notable in his iconic paintings such as The Scream.

  



 


 

Kierkegaard's Influence on Literature, Criticism and Art
Tome II: Denmark
Aldershot: Ashgate 2013
xiii+190pp.
(Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 12)

 

While Kierkegaard is primarily known as a philosopher or religious thinker, his writings have also been used extensively by literary writers, critics and artists. This use can be traced in the work of major cultural figures not just in Denmark and Scandinavia but also in the wider world. These later figures have been attracted to Kierkegaard due to a number of reasons, for example, his creative mixing of genres, his complex use of pseudonyms, his rhetoric and literary style, and his rich images, parables, and allegories. The goal of the present volume is to document this influence in the different language groups and traditions.

Tome II is dedicated to the use of Kierkegaard by later Danish writers. Almost from the beginning Kierkegaard’s works were standard reading for these authors. Danish novelists and critics from the Modern Breakthrough movement in the 1870s were among the first to make extensive use of his writings. These included the theoretical leader of the movement, the critic Georg Brandes, who wrote an entire book on Kierkegaard, and the novelists Jens Peter Jacobsen and Henrik Pontoppidan. The next generation of writers from the turn of the century and through the First World War also saw in Kierkegaard important points of inspiration. These included Ernesto Dalgas and Harald Kidde, who used elements of Kierkegaard’s thought in their novels. Modern Danish writers such as Karen Blixen, Martin A. Hansen, and Villy Sørensen have continued to incorporate Kierkegaard into their works. There can be no doubt that Kierkegaard has indelibly stamped his name on Danish literature.

  



 


 

Kierkegaard's Influence on Literature, Criticism and Art
Tome I: The Germanophone World
Aldershot: Ashgate 2013
xxi+260pp.
(Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 12)

 

While Kierkegaard is primarily known as a philosopher or religious thinker, his writings have also been used extensively by literary writers, critics and artists. This use can be traced in the work of major cultural figures not just in Denmark and Scandinavia but also in the wider world. These later figures have been attracted to Kierkegaard due to a number of reasons, for example, his creative mixing of genres, his complex use of pseudonyms, his rhetoric and literary style, and his rich images, parables, and allegories. The goal of the present volume is to document this influence in the different language groups and traditions.

 

Tome I explores Kierkegaard’s influence on literature and art in the Germanophone world. He was an important source of inspiration for German writers such as Theodor Fontane, Thomas Mann, Rainer Maria Rilke, Alfred Andersch, and Martin Walser. Kierkegaard’s influence was particularly strong in Austria during the generation of modernist authors such as Rudolf Kassner, Karl Kraus, Robert Musil, and Hermann Broch. Due presumably in part to the German translations of Kierkegaard in the Austrian cultural journal Der Brenner, Kierkegaard continued to be used by later figures such as the novelist and playwright, Thomas Bernhard. His thought was also appropriated in Switzerland through the works of Max Frisch and Friedrich Dürrenmatt. The famous Czech author Franz Kafka identified personally with Kierkegaard’s sad love story with Regine Olsen and made use of his reflections on this and other topics.

 

 


 


 

Kierkegaard's Influence on Theology
Tome III: Catholic and Jewish Theology
Aldershot: Ashgate 2012
xiii+220pp.
(
Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 10)

 

Kierkegaard has always enjoyed a rich reception in the fields of theology and religious studies. This reception might seem to be obvious given the fact that he is one of the most important Christian writers of the nineteenth century. However, upon closer examination, the matter is not so obvious as it may seem since Kierkegaard was by no means a straightforward theologian in any traditional sense. He had no enduring interest in some of the main fields of theology such as church history or biblical studies, and he is strikingly silent on many key Christian dogmas. Moreover, he harbored a degree of animosity towards the university theologians and churchmen of his own day. Despite this, he has been a source of inspiration for numerous religious writers from different denominations and traditions.

Tome III explores the reception of Kierkegaard’s thought in the Catholic and Jewish theological traditions. Although the first Catholic reactions to Kierkegaard appeared shortly after his death, it is especially in the early decades of the twentieth century that Kierkegaard’s thought became an important topic in the Catholic circles. In the 1920s Kierkegaard’s intellectual and spiritual legacy became widely discussed in the Catholic Hochland Circle, whose members included Theodor Haecker, Romano Guardini, Alois Dempf and Peter Wust. Another key figure of the mid-war years was the prolific Jesuit author Erich Przywara. During and especially after World War II Kierkegaard’s ideas found an echo in the works of several trend-setting Catholic theologians of the day such as Hans Urs von Balthasar, Henri de Lubac and the popular spiritual author Thomas Merton. The second part of Tome III focuses on the reception of Kierkegaard’s thought in the Jewish theological tradition, introducing the reader to authors who significantly shaped Jewish religious thought both in the United States and in Israel. These theologians come from and represent a variety of religious and political backgrounds: the spiritual world of Hasidism, Modern Orthodox Judaism of Mithnaggedic origin, and Modern Religious Zionism.


Reviews

"Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources is continuing to prove a remarkable achievement, and is cumulatively providing an important point of reference for all those working on Kierkegaard, whether they are specialists looking to follow up on some aspect of his work or its reception that lies outside the purview of their own research or whether they are novices looking for a way ‘in’, perhaps so as to check out why or how Kierkegaard relates to their own primary field of study. It is also developing – as was envisaged from the start – into an extremely large project of almost encyclopaedic proportions (although the articles are for the most part full-length scholarly essays rather than brief encyclopaedia notices). The systematic organization of the work means that topics that have often been neglected in writing about Kierkegaard get their due....Like other volumes in the series, this contains work of very high quality, thoroughly researched and clearly presented."
George Pattison, Marginalia: A Review of Books in History, Theology and Religion, January 29, 2013 (online journal).


 


 

Kierkegaard's Influence on Theology
Tome II: Anglophone and Scandinavian Protestant Theology
Aldershot: Ashgate 2012
xiii+228pp.
(
Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 10)

 

Kierkegaard has always enjoyed a rich reception in the fields of theology and religious studies. This reception might seem to be obvious given the fact that he is one of the most important Christian writers of the nineteenth century. However, upon closer examination, the matter is not so obvious as it may seem since Kierkegaard was by no means a straightforward theologian in any traditional sense. He had no enduring interest in some of the main fields of theology such as church history or biblical studies, and he is strikingly silent on many key Christian dogmas. Moreover, he harbored a degree of animosity towards the university theologians and churchmen of his own day. Despite this, he has been a source of inspiration for numerous religious writers from different denominations and traditions.

Tome II is dedicated to tracing Kierkegaard’s influence in Anglophone and Scandinavian Protestant religious thought. Kierkegaard has been a provocative force in the English-speaking world since the early twentieth century, inspiring almost contradictory receptions. In Britain, before World War I the few literati who were familiar with his work tended to assimilate Kierkegaard to the heroic individualism of Ibsen and Nietzsche. In the United States knowledge of Kierkegaard was introduced by Scandinavian immigrants who brought with them a picture of the Dane as being much more sympathetic to traditional Christianity. The interpretation of Kierkegaard in Britain and America during the early and mid-twentieth century generally reflected the sensibilities of the particular theological interpreter. The Anglican theologians generally found Kierkegaard to be too one-sided in his critique of reason and culture, while theologians hailing from the Reformed tradition often saw him as an insightful harbinger of neo-orthodoxy. The second part of Tome II is dedicated to the Kierkegaard reception in Scandinavian theology, featuring articles on Norwegian and Swedish theologians influenced by Kierkegaard.


 

Reviews

"This comprehensive series of Kierkegaard research aims at charting the historical reception and wide-ranging influence of the Danish philosopher-theologian. As with its sister-tome, this book charts the impact of Kierkegaard on many diverse theological figures who – in one way or another – have made use of his writings....Overall, this is a vigorously-researched and stimulating collection that further breeds discussion over Kierkegaard's relationship to theology. Well-known areas of disputation are seen here through the eyes of many who have wrestled with assessing Kierkegaard’s value in theological discourse. It seems the Dane’s inconvenient voice is not easily muted, even by those who would rather he had been a little quieter."
Aaron Edwards, Theological Book Review, vol. 24, no. 2, 2012

 


 


 

Kierkegaard's Influence on Theology
Tome I: German Protestant Theology
Aldershot: Ashgate 2012
xxi+406pp.
(
Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 10)

 

Kierkegaard has always enjoyed a rich reception in the fields of theology and religious studies. This reception might seem to be obvious given the fact that he is one of the most important Christian writers of the nineteenth century. However, upon closer examination, the matter is not so obvious as it may seem since Kierkegaard was by no means a straightforward theologian in any traditional sense. He had no enduring interest in some of the main fields of theology such as church history or biblical studies, and he is strikingly silent on many key Christian dogmas. Moreover, he harbored a degree of animosity towards the university theologians and churchmen of his own day. Despite this, he has been a source of inspiration for numerous religious writers from different denominations and traditions.

 

Tome I is dedicated to the reception of Kierkegaard among German Protestant theologians and religious thinkers. The writings of some of these figures turned out to be instrumental for Kierkegaard’s breakthrough internationally shortly after the turn of the twentieth century. Leading figures of the movement of “dialectical theology” such as Karl Barth, Emil Brunner, Paul Tillich and Rudolf Bultmann spawned a steadily growing awareness of and interest in Kierkegaard’s thought among generations of German theology students.
Emanuel Hirsch was greatly influenced by Kierkegaard and proved instrumental in disseminating his thought by producing the first complete German edition of Kierkegaard’s published works. Both Barth and Hirsch established unique ways of reading and appropriating Kierkegaard, which to a certain degree determined the direction and course of Kierkegaard studies right up to our own times.



Reviews

"In this volume, we see close analyses of many important thinkers’ appropriations and rejections of his thought. Kierkegaard is perhaps the most misunderstood and easily-caricatured thinker of the modern era. His reception and translation in certain German theological schools has often been crucial to such misunderstandings....This volume contains fascinating articles on each of these key thinkers (and others), with in-depth analysis on the Kierkegaard texts they read, how they used them, and what impact he made on their overall thought. These studies highlight insightful details and patterns that will be of enormous use to those wishing to navigate the thought-trends of these theologians. As well as those more notable Kierkegaard interpreters of the early twentieth century, there are interesting articles on those less well-known as readers of Kierkegaard, such as Moltmann and Pannenberg....As expected of this impressive series, these essays are impeccably researched, proving extremely valuable both for Kierkegaard scholarship and those wishing to map theological trajectories more generally."
Aaron Edwards, Theological Book Review, vol. 24, no. 2, 2012



 



Kierkegaard's Influence on Philosophy
Tome III: Anglophone Philosophy
Aldershot: Ashgate 2012
xiii+239pp.
(
Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 11)

 

Kierkegaard’s relation to the field of philosophy is a particularly complex and disputed one. He rejected the model of philosophical inquiry that was mainstream in his day and was careful to have his pseudonymous authors repeatedly disassociate themselves from philosophy. But although it seems clear that Kierkegaard never regarded himself as a philosopher, nonetheless there can be no doubt that his writings contain philosophical ideas and insights. Many later thinkers have used his works as a source of insights and ideas that they could apply in the context of their own philosophical program. As a result, his thought has been profoundly influential in a number of different philosophical traditions.

The present volume attempts to document these different traditions of the philosophical reception of Kierkegaard’s thought. The articles featured here aim to demonstrate the vast reach of Kierkegaard’s writings in philosophical contexts that were often quite different from his own.

 

Tome III traces Kierkegaard’s influence on Anglophone philosophy. It has long been thought that Kierkegaard played no role in this tradition, which for years was dominated by analytic philosophy. In this environment it was common to dismiss Kierkegaard along with the then current European philosophers who were influenced by him. However, a closer look reveals that in fact there were several thinkers in the US, Canada and Great Britain who were inspired by Kierkegaard even during the heyday of analytic philosophy. Leading Anglophone philosophers read Kierkegaard and made at least some limited use of him. The situation today is much different. It can be said that Kierkegaard has made some serious inroads into mainstream Anglophone philosophy, and many authors are today seeking inspiration in his works for current discussions concerning ethics, personal identity, philosophy of religion, and philosophical anthropology.
 

 

 


Kierkegaard's Influence on Philosophy
Tome II: Francophone Philosophy
Aldershot: Ashgate 2012
(
Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 11)

 

Kierkegaard’s relation to the field of philosophy is a particularly complex and disputed one. He rejected the model of philosophical inquiry that was mainstream in his day and was careful to have his pseudonymous authors repeatedly disassociate themselves from philosophy. But although it seems clear that Kierkegaard never regarded himself as a philosopher, nonetheless there can be no doubt that his writings contain philosophical ideas and insights. Many later thinkers have used his works as a source of insights and ideas that they could apply in the context of their own philosophical program. As a result, his thought has been profoundly influential in a number of different philosophical traditions.

The present volume attempts to document these different traditions of the philosophical reception of Kierkegaard’s thought. The articles featured here aim to demonstrate the vast reach of Kierkegaard’s writings in philosophical contexts that were often quite different from his own.
 

Tome II is dedicated to exploring Kierkegaard’s influence on Francophone philosophy. The French intellectual tradition squares well with Kierkegaard’s eclectic profile since its leading figures are often difficult to classify unambiguously as philosophers, theologians, literary critics or simply writers. Kierkegaard’s thinking was highly influential for many generations of French philosophers right up to this very day. Ever since the discovery of Kierkegaard in the Francophone world, he has remained a fixed pillar in French philosophy. He has been influential in the context of most every modern school of French thought: phenomenology, feminism, structuralism, post-structuralism, semiotics, and deconstruction.



Reviews

"This collection of essays belongs to the ‘reception’ section of Jon Stewart’s vast editorial project, Kierkegaard
Research: Sources, Reception and Resources....This book, the second tome of volume 11, Kierkegaard’s Influence
on Philosophy
, provides an extremely useful starting-point for exploring the diverse responses to Kierkegaard’s texts and ideas in twentieth-century French thought."

Clare Carlisle, H-France Review, vol. 13, no. 168, 2013, pp. 1-3.

________________________


"A brilliant example of scholarship, this well-referenced collection will appeal to specialists."
Yolande Aline Helm, French Review, vol. 88, no. 2, October 2014, p. 251.

 


Kierkegaard's Influence on Philosophy
Tome I: German and Scandinavian Philosophy
Aldershot: Ashgate 2012
xix+312pp.
(
Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 11)

 

Kierkegaard’s relation to the field of philosophy is a particularly complex and disputed one. He rejected the model of philosophical inquiry that was mainstream in his day and was careful to have his pseudonymous authors repeatedly disassociate themselves from philosophy. But although it seems clear that Kierkegaard never regarded himself as a philosopher, nonetheless there can be no doubt that his writings contain philosophical ideas and insights. Many later thinkers have used his works as a source of insights and ideas that they could apply in the context of their own philosophical program. As a result, his thought has been profoundly influential in a number of different philosophical traditions.

The present volume attempts to document these different traditions of the philosophical reception of Kierkegaard’s thought. The articles featured here aim to demonstrate the vast reach of Kierkegaard’s writings in philosophical contexts that were often quite different from his own.
 

Tome I is dedicated to exploring the reception of Kierkegaard in Germanophone and Scandinavian philosophy. As is the case in theology, his influence in philosophy is particularly strong in the German-speaking world. Kierkegaard has been a major influence for such different philosophical projects as phenomenology, hermeneutics, dialogical thinking, critical theory, Marxism, logical positivism and ordinary language philosophy. Similarly, in Denmark and Norway, Kierkegaard’s writings have been more or less constantly discussed by important philosophers, despite the later dominance of analytic philosophy in these countries. The present volume features articles on the leading Germanophone and Scandinavian philosophers influenced by Kierkegaard’s thought.



Reviews

"...when one marvels at the scope of this series as a whole, it becomes clear that this tome fits into a broader collection which approaches the subject of Kierkegaard from about as balanced and diverse a perspective as one might expect to find, making it an invaluable resource."
Mark Daniel Safstrom, German Studies Review, vol. 36, no. 1, 2013, pp. 191-193.

 






The Heibergs and the Theater:
Between Vaudeville, Romantic Comedy and National Drama

Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press 2012
vii+269pp.
(
Danish Golden Age Studies, vol. 7)


Not only was Johan Ludvig Heiberg the most famous theater critic of the Danish Golden Age, but he also wrote the most important aesthetic essays about theater. Some of his dramatic works belong to most successful plays ever performed at the Royal Theater. Moreover, Heiberg was married to one of the greatest Danish actresses of the nineteenth century. Both his wife Johanne Luise Heiberg and his mother Thomasine Gyllembourg wrote dramatic works that were performed on the stage of the Royal Theater. At the end of his career Heiberg finally became director of the Royal Theater from 1849 to 1856.

Seen from today’s point of view Heiberg dominated theater life in the mid-nineteenth century Denmark in an absolutely unique and astonishing way. But it is not only because of his remarkable position in the small literary field of Golden Age Denmark that his dramatic works and his theory of theater are worthy of study. As the articles in this volume show, Heiberg’s lifelong occupation with theater was closely tied to his far-reaching philosophical and political interests. In this respect his aesthetic essays as well as his plays offer useful material for those hoping to obtain new insight into the cultural life of Golden Age Denmark in general.



Reviews
“The Heibergs and the Theater is clearly an important contribution to the evolving field of Heiberg studies. It provides a wealth of valuable insights into the history and culture of the Danish Golden Age and, of course, into the Heibergs themselves. For the most part, the pieces work nicely together to create a significantly new and provocative picture of the Danish Golden Age, even as they cross sometimes well-trodden territory. What is perhaps most notable is the nuance and complexity explored by the volume….Two decades ago, one would have been hard- pressed to find such discussions of the Heibergs. This volume represents not just an important addition to the field, but also a significant leap forward in the growing sophistication of the field."
Nate Kramer, Scandinavian Studies, vol. 87, no. 2, 2015, pp. 303-309.


________________________


"Heiberg’s memory was restored by the many years of philological research of scholars like Bruce Kirmmse, Alastair Hannay and others that was completed by the efforts of the Kierkegaard Research Centre in Copenhagen initiated and directed by Niels Jørgen Cappelørn and masterfully executed by Jon Stewart. These revealed Heiberg’s real importance and influence based on accurate philological research followed by translations and publications of his works to make the forgotten texts available....This volume...helps us to understand deeper and better the role and the activity of the most influential family of 19th century Copenhagen."
András Nagy, European Journal of Scandinavian Studies, vol. 45, no. 2, 2015, pp. 240-248.

 


Hans Lassen Martensen:
Theologian, Philosopher and Social Critic

Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press 2012
xiii+353pp.
(
Danish Golden Age Studies, vol. 6)

 

Although he has long been known primarily as the object of Søren Kierkegaard’s disdain, Hans Lassen Martensen (1808-84) was a celebrated figure in his own time. Recognized as a brilliant scholar and highly successful churchman, Martensen worked in a number of different areas of theology and philosophy, producing an impressive literary corpus over a period of several decades. His authorship is remarkably varied, including philosophical treatises, theological tracts, sermons, eulogies, book and theater reviews, as well as polemical and occasional pieces. During his lifetime, he saw his works translated into German, Swedish, English, French, Hungarian and Dutch. These works were widely read and frequently reprinted in numerous editions throughout the second half of the century. It is unfortunate that to international research he was known for many years only as a central figure in Kierkegaard’s attack on the Danish State Church.

In the past few decades there has, however, been a renewed appreciation for Martensen as an important thinker in his own right. The present anthology attempts to bring together the works of the leading Danish and international scholars responsible for this recent surge of interest. In order to capture the different aspects of Martensen’s thought, the volume has been organized into three main rubrics: I. Theology, II. Philosophy, and III. Politics and Social Theory. Collectively, the articles featured here treat Martensen’s main works from his dissertation, On the Autonomy of Human Self-Consciousness in 1837 to his monumental, three-volume Christian Ethics from the 1870s. The authors demonstrate that the problems critically addressed by Martensen in the Danish Golden Age are still very much with us today in the twenty-first century.
 

 

 


Kierkegaard's Influence on Social-Political Thought
Aldershot: Ashgate 2011
xxiii+286pp.
(
Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 14)

 

While scholars have long recognized Kierkegaard’s important contributions to fields such as ethics, aesthetics, philosophy of religion, philosophical psychology, and hermeneutics, it was usually thought that he had nothing to say about society or politics.

Kierkegaard has been traditionally characterized as a Christian writer who placed supreme importance on the inward religious life of each individual believer. His radical view seemed to many to undermine any meaningful conception of the community, society or the state. In recent years, however, scholars have begun to correct this image of Kierkegaard as an apolitical thinker.

The present volume attempts to document the use of Kierkegaard by later thinkers in the context of social-political thought. It shows how his ideas have been employed by very different kinds of writers and activists with very different political goals and agendas. Many of the articles show that, although Kierkegaard has been criticized for his reactionary views on some social and political questions, he has been appropriated as a source of insight and inspiration by a number of later thinkers with very progressive, indeed, visionary political views.
 

 

 


Kierkegaard's Influence on the Social Sciences
Aldershot: Ashgate 2011
xix+335pp.
(
Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 13)

 

Kierkegaard has long been known as a philosopher and theologian, but his contributions to psychology, anthropology and sociology have also made an important impact on these fields. In many of the works of his complex authorship, Kierkegaard presents his intriguing and unique vision of the nature and mental life of human beings individually and collectively.

The articles featured in the present volume explore the reception of Kierkegaard’s thought in the social sciences. Of these fields Kierkegaard is perhaps best known in psychology, where The Concept of Anxiety and The Sickness unto Death have been the two most influential texts. With regard to the field of sociology, social criticism, or social theory, Kierkegaard’s Literary Review of Two Ages has also been regarded as offering valuable insights about some important dynamics of modern society.
 

 

 


Kierkegaard and Existentialism
Aldershot: Ashgate 2011
xix+329pp.
(
Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 9)

 

The term “existentialism” has traditionally been notoriously difficult to define due to the fact that the label has been attached to the work of so many different thinkers with such diverse agendas. However, there can be no doubt that most of the thinkers who are usually associated with the existentialist tradition, for whatever their actual doctrines, were in one way or another influenced by the writings of Kierkegaard.

This influence is so great that it can be fairly stated that the existentialist movement was in large part responsible for the major advance in Kierkegaard’s international reception that took place in the twentieth century. It was with existentialism that Kierkegaard first entered the standard canon of Western philosophy.

In Kierkegaard’s writings one can find a rich array of concepts such as anxiety, despair, freedom, sin, the crowd, and sickness that all came to be standard motifs in existentialist literature.

Jean-Paul Sartre played an important role in canonizing Kierkegaard as one of the forerunners of existentialism. However, recent scholarship has been attentive to his ideological use of Kierkegaard. Indeed, Sartre seemed to be exploiting Kierkegaard for his own purposes and not accurately representing the thought of the Dane in its original nineteenth-century philosophical milieu. For example, it has been common to point out that Kierkegaard would not even agree with Sartre’s own stated first principle of existentialism that existence precedes essence. Suspicions of misrepresentation and distortions have led recent commentators to go back and reexamine the complex relation between Kierkegaard and the existentialist thinkers.

The articles in the present volume feature figures from the French, German, Spanish and Russian traditions of existentialism. They examine the rich and varied use of Kierkegaard by these later thinkers, and, most importantly, they critically analyze his purported role in this famous intellectual movement.


Reviews

"...this volume is a rich resource for Kierkegaard scholars. There have been other essays on Kierkegaard in relation to many of these thinkers, but the great merit of this volume is the way it collects thorough, detailed, and up-to-date studies of Kierkegaard’s influence on these thinkers, as well as bibliographic information on the relevant scholarship....Consequently, this volume (like this series) will serve as the ideal first stop for researchers seeking to understand Kierkegaard in relation to other major philosophical, theological, and literary figures."
Brian Gregor, Philosophy in Review, vol. 32, no. 1, 2012, pp. 58-61.

________________________


"Overall, this book is a wonderful addition to the work already completed in the Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources series. It is certainly a fantastic research tool to have when working on the reception of Kierkegaard’s thought among the existentialists. To this end, one of its greatest elements are the bibliographies found at the end of each essay; together these provide a plethora of further resources in a number of languages which highlight the references to (and uses of) Kierkegaard in each philosopher’s oeuvre, the sources of each thinker’s knowledge of Kierkegaard, as well as the relevant secondary literature treating Kierkegaard’s relation to each given figure."
Harris B. Bechtol, The Bibliographia, 2013, pp. 1-7.

________________________


"This book provides an excellent starting point for researchers looking to situate Kierkegaard with other thinkers commonly labeled as 'existentialists.' "
Eric Hamm, Søren Kierkegaard Newsletter, no. 62, 2014, pp. 20-21.

________________________

"The book as a whole contains much information on the genesis of Existentialism and on Kierkegaard's role in it."
Milan Petkanic, Filozofia, vol. 68, no. 1, 2013, pp. 87-90.



Kierkegaard and His Danish Contemporaries
Tome I: Philosophy, Politics and Social Theory
Aldershot: Ashgate 2009
xix+329pp.
(
Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 7)

 

The period of Kierkegaard’s life corresponds to Denmark’s “Golden Age,” which is conventionally used to refer to the period covering roughly the first half of the nineteenth century, when Denmark’s most important writers, philosophers, theologians, poets, actors and artists flourished. Kierkegaard was often in dialogue with his fellow Danes on key issues of the day. His authorship would be unthinkable without reference to the Danish State Church, the Royal Theater, the University of Copenhagen or the various Danish newspapers and journals, such as The Corsair, Fædrelandet, and Kjøbenhavns flyvende Post, which played an undeniable role in shaping his development.

The present volume features articles that employ source-work research in order to explore the individual Danish sources of Kierkegaard’s thought. The volume is divided into three tomes in order to cover the different fields of influence.

Tome I is dedicated to exploring the sources that fall under the rubrics, “Philosophy, Politics and Social Theory.” With regard to philosophy, Danish scholars of the day were profoundly influenced by German idealism. Through their efforts the philosophies of Kant, Schelling and Hegel made their way to Denmark. Kierkegaard read the works of all of these Danish thinkers and their German antecedents. While he was sympathetic to individual ideas offered by this tradition, he was generally keen to criticize the German model of philosophy and to propose a new paradigm for philosophical thought that was more in tune with lived existence. Kierkegaard also experienced the dynamic period in history that saw the great upheavals throughout Europe in connection with the revolutions of 1848 and the First Schleswig War. While it has long been claimed that Kierkegaard was not interested in politics, recent research supports a quite different picture. To be sure, he cannot be regarded as a political scientist or social theorist in a traditional sense, but he was nonetheless engaged in the issues of his day, and in his works one can certainly find material that can be insightful for the fields of politics and social theory.
 

 


 



Kierkegaard and His Danish Contemporaries
Tome II: Theology
Aldershot: Ashgate 2009
xiii+364pp.
(
Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 7)

 

The period of Kierkegaard’s life corresponds to Denmark’s “Golden Age,” which is conventionally used to refer to the period covering roughly the first half of the nineteenth century, when Denmark’s most important writers, philosophers, theologians, poets, actors and artists flourished. Kierkegaard was often in dialogue with his fellow Danes on key issues of the day. His authorship would be unthinkable without reference to the Danish State Church, the Royal Theater, the University of Copenhagen or the various Danish newspapers and journals, such as The Corsair, Fædrelandet, and Kjøbenhavns flyvende Post, which played an undeniable role in shaping his development.

The present volume features articles that employ source-work research in order to explore the individual Danish sources of Kierkegaard’s thought. The volume is divided into three tomes in order to cover the different fields of influence.

Tome II is dedicated to the host of Danish theologians who played a greater or lesser role in shaping Kierkegaard’s thought. In his day there were a number of competing theological trends both within the church and at the Faculty of Theology at the University of Copenhagen, and not least of all in the blossoming free church movements. These included rationalism, Grundtvigianism and Hegelianism. In this quite dynamic period in Danish ecclesial history, Kierkegaard was also exercised by a number of leading personalities in the church as they attempted to come to terms with key issues such as baptism, civil marriage, the revision of the traditional psalm book, and the relation of church and state.
 

 

 


Kierkegaard and His Danish Contemporaries
Tome III: Literature, Drama and Aesthetics
Aldershot: Ashgate 2009
xiii+309pp.
(
Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 7)

 

The period of Kierkegaard’s life corresponds to Denmark’s “Golden Age,” which is conventionally used to refer to the period covering roughly the first half of the nineteenth century, when Denmark’s most important writers, philosophers, theologians, poets, actors and artists flourished. Kierkegaard was often in dialogue with his fellow Danes on key issues of the day. His authorship would be unthinkable without reference to the Danish State Church, the Royal Theater, the University of Copenhagen or the various Danish newspapers and journals, such as The Corsair, Fædrelandet, and Kjøbenhavns flyvende Post, which played an undeniable role in shaping his development.

The present volume features articles that employ source-work research in order to explore the individual Danish sources of Kierkegaard’s thought. The volume is divided into three tomes in order to cover the different fields of influence.

Tome III is dedicated to the diverse Danish sources that fall under the rubrics “Literature, Drama and Aesthetics.” The Golden Age is known as the period when Danish prose first established itself in genres such as the novel; moreover, it was also an age when some of Denmark’s most celebrated national poets flourished. Accordingly, this tome contains articles on Kierkegaard’s use of the great Danish poets and prose writers, whose works are frequently quoted and alluded to throughout his writings. Kierkegaard regularly attended dramatic performances at Copenhagen’s Royal Theater, which was one of Europe’s leading playhouses at the time. In this tome his appreciation for the art of Denmark’s best-known actors and actresses is traced. Finally, this tome features articles on the leading literary critics and aesthetic theorists of the Golden Age, who served as foils for Kierkegaard’s own ideas.
 

 

 



Kierkegaard and the Renaissance and Modern Traditions
Tome I: Philosophy
Aldershot: Ashgate 2009
xix+202pp.
(
Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 5)

 

The long period from the Renaissance to the nineteenth century supplied numerous sources for Kierkegaard’s thought in any number of different fields. The present, rather heterogeneous volume covers the long period from the birth of Savonarola in 1452 through the beginning of the nineteenth century and into Kierkegaard’s own time. The Danish thinker read authors representing vastly different traditions and time periods. Moreover, he also read a diverse range of genres. His interests concerned not just philosophy, theology and literature but also drama and music. The present volume consists of three tomes that are intended to cover Kierkegaard’s sources in these different fields of thought.

Tome I is dedicated to the philosophers of the early modern period and the Enlightenment who played a role in shaping Kierkegaard’s intellectual development. He was widely read in German and French philosophy of the sixteenth, seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, making reference to the leading rationalist philosophers Descartes, Spinoza and Leibniz in his journals and published works. Further, connections have also been pointed out between his thought and the writings of the French thinkers Montaigne, Pascal and Rousseau, who share with Kierkegaard a form of philosophy that is more interested in life and existence than purely conceptual analysis. Through the works of the authors explored here Kierkegaard became acquainted with some of the major philosophical discussions of the modern era such as the beginning of philosophy, the role of doubt, the status of autonomy in ethics and religion, human freedom, the problem of the theodicy found in thinkers such as Bayle and Leibniz, and the problem of the relation of philosophy to religion as it appears in the German writers Jacobi and Lessing.
 

 

 



Kierkegaard and the Renaissance and Modern Traditions
Tome II: Theology
Aldershot: Ashgate 2009
xiii+268pp.
(
Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 5)


The long period from the Renaissance to the nineteenth century supplied numerous sources for Kierkegaard’s thought in any number of different fields. The present, rather heterogeneous volume covers the long period from the birth of Savonarola in 1452 through the beginning of the nineteenth century and into Kierkegaard’s own time. The Danish thinker read authors representing vastly different traditions and time periods. Moreover, he also read a diverse range of genres. His interests concerned not just philosophy, theology and literature but also drama and music. The present volume consists of three tomes that are intended to cover Kierkegaard’s sources in these different fields of thought.

Tome II is dedicated to the wealth of theological and religious sources from the beginning of the Reformation to Kierkegaard’s own day. It examines Kierkegaard’s relations to some of the key figures of the Reformation period, from the Lutheran, Reformed and Catholic traditions. It thus explores Kierkegaard’s reception of theologians and spiritual authors of various denominations, most of whom are known to history primarily for their exposition of practical spirituality rather than theological doctrine. Several of the figures investigated here are connected to the Protestant tradition of Pietism that Kierkegaard was familiar with from a very early stage. The main figures in this context include the “forefather” of Pietism Johann Arndt, the Reformed writer Gerhard Tersteegen, and the Danish author Hans Adolph Brorson. With regard to Catholicism, Kierkegaard was familiar with several popular figures of Catholic humanism, Post-Tridentine theology and Baroque spirituality, such as François Fénelon, Ludwig Blosius and Abraham a Sancta Clara. He was also able to find inspiration in highly controversial and original figures of the Renaissance and the early Modern period, such as Girolamo Savonarola or Jacob Böhme, the latter of whom was at the time an en vogue topic among trendsetting philosophers and theologians such as Hegel, Franz von Baader, Schelling and Hans Lassen Martensen.
 

 


 



Kierkegaard and the Renaissance and Modern Traditions
Tome III: Literature, Drama, and Music
Aldershot: Ashgate 2009
xiii+292pp.
(
Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 5)


The long period from the Renaissance to the nineteenth century supplied numerous sources for Kierkegaard’s thought in any number of different fields. The present, rather heterogeneous volume covers the long period from the birth of Savonarola in 1452 through the beginning of the nineteenth century and into Kierkegaard’s own time. The Danish thinker read authors representing vastly different traditions and time periods. Moreover, he also read a diverse range of genres. His interests concerned not just philosophy, theology and literature but also drama and music. The present volume consists of three tomes that are intended to cover Kierkegaard’s sources in these different fields of thought.

Tome III covers the sources that are relevant for literature, drama and music. Kierkegaard was well read in the European literature of the seventeen and eighteenth century. He was captivated by the figure of Cervantes’ Don Quixote, who is used as a model for humor and irony. He also enjoyed French literature, represented here by articles on Chateaubriand, Lamartine, and Mérimée. French dramatists were popular on the Danish stage, and Kierkegaard demonstrated an interest in, among others, Moliére and Scribe. Although he never possessed strong English skills, this did not prevent him from familiarizing himself with English literature, primarily with the help of German translations. While there is an established body of secondary material on Kierkegaard’s relation to Shakespeare, little has been said about his use of the Irish dramatist Sheridan. It is obvious from, among other things, The Concept of Irony that Kierkegaard knew in detail the works of some of the main writers of the German Romantic movement. However, his use of the leading figures of the British Romantic movement, Byron and Shelley, remains largely unexplored terrain. The classic Danish authors of the eighteenth century, Holberg, Wessel and Ewald, were influential figures who prepared the way for the Golden Age of Danish poetry. Kierkegaard constantly refers to their dramatic characters, whom he often employs to illustrate a philosophical idea with a pregnant example or turn of phrase. Finally, while Kierkegaard is not an obvious name in musicology, his analysis of Mozart’s Don Giovanni shows that he had a keen interest in music on many different levels.


 





Kierkegaard and the Roman World
Aldershot: Ashgate 2009
xiii+219pp.
(
Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 3)


While Kierkegaard's use of the Greek authors, particularly Plato and Aristotle, has attracted considerable attention over the years, his use of the Roman authors has, by contrast, remained sadly neglected. This neglect is somewhat surprising given the fact that Kierkegaard was extremely well read in Latin from his early youth when he attended the Borgerdyd School in Copenhagen. Kierkegaard's interest in the Roman authors is perhaps best evidenced by his book collection. In his private library he had a long list of Latin titles and Danish translations of the standard Roman authors in any number of different genres. His extensive and frequent use of writers such as Cicero, Horace, Terence, Seneca, Suetonius and Ovid clearly warrants placing them in the select group of his major sources.

The chapters in this volume demonstrate that Kierkegaard made use of the Roman sources in various ways. His readings from the Borgerdyd school seem to have stuck with him as an adult. He constantly refers to Roman authors, such as Livy, Nepos, and Suetonius for colourful stories and anecdotes. In addition, he avails himself of pregnant sayings or formulations from the Roman authors, when appropriate. But his use of these authors is not merely as a rhetorical source. He is also profoundly interested in the Roman philosophy of Cicero, Seneca and Marcus Aurelius. Similarly, just as he is fascinated by Tacitus' portrayal of the early Christians, so also he is amused by the humour of Terence and Apuleius. In short, the Roman authors serve to enrich many different aspects of Kierkegaard's authorship with respect to both content and form.
 

 


 



Kierkegaard's International Reception
Tome I: Northern and Western Europe
Aldershot: Ashgate 2009
xviii+491pp.
(
Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 8)


Although Kierkegaard’s reception was initially more or less limited to Scandinavia, it has for a long time now been a highly international affair. As his writings became translated into the different languages, his reputation spread, and he became read more and more by people increasingly distant from his native Denmark. While in Scandinavia, the attack on the Church in the last years of his life became something of a cause célèbre, later many different aspects of his work became the object of serious scholarly investigation well beyond the original northern borders. As his reputation grew, he was co-opted by a number of different philosophical and religious movements in different contexts throughout the world. The three tomes of the present volume attempt to record the history of this reception according to national and linguistic categories.
 

Tome I covers the reception of Kierkegaard in Northern and Western Europe. The articles on Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Finland and Iceland can be said to trace Kierkegaard’s influence more or less in its native Nordic Protestant context. Since the authors in these countries (with the exception of Finland) were not dependent on translations or other intermediaries, this represents the earliest tradition of Kierkegaard reception. The early German translations of his works opened the door for the next, broader phase of Kierkegaard’s reception. The articles in the section on Western Europe trace his influence in the German-speaking world, Switzerland, Great Britain, the French-speaking world, and the Dutch-speaking world. All of these have their own extensive tradition of Kierkegaard reception.


Reviews

"This book continues the Søren Kierkegaard Research Centre’s series, Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources. The series is the most important single collection of secondary literature on Kierkegaard to be published in recent years and it is possibly the most important ever published. The particular contribution of this book is to trace the history of Kierkegaard’s reception in Northern and Western Europe, providing an invaluable overview of the history of scholarship in those countries that were among the first and most important to receive the philosopher....As an aid to Kierkegaard research, nothing as comprehensive can be found in a single volume."
Will Williams, Religious Studies Review, vol. 35, no. 4, 2009, p. 252.


 



Kierkegaard's International Reception
Tome II:
Southern, Central and Eastern Europe
Aldershot: Ashgate 2009
xii+340pp.
(
Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 8)


Although Kierkegaard’s reception was initially more or less limited to Scandinavia, it has for a long time now been a highly international affair. As his writings became translated into the different languages, his reputation spread, and he became read more and more by people increasingly distant from his native Denmark. While in Scandinavia, the attack on the Church in the last years of his life became something of a cause célèbre, later many different aspects of his work became the object of serious scholarly investigation well beyond the original northern borders. As his reputation grew, he was co-opted by a number of different philosophical and religious movements in different contexts throughout the world. The three tomes of the present volume attempt to record the history of this reception according to national and linguistic categories.
 

Tome II covers the reception of Kierkegaard in Southern, Central and Eastern Europe. The first set of articles, under the rubric “Southern Europe,” covers Portugal, Spain, and Italy. The reception in these countries shares a number of common features including a Catholic cultural context and a debt to the French reception. The next group covers the rather heterogeneous group of countries designated here as “Central Europe”: Hungary, the Czech Republic, Slovakia and Poland. These countries are loosely bound in a cultural sense by their former affiliation with the Habsburg Empire and in a religious sense by their shared Catholicism. Finally, the Orthodox countries of “Eastern Europe” are represented with articles on Russia, Bulgaria, Serbia and Montenegro, Macedonia, and Romania.
 

 


 



Kierkegaard's International Reception
Tome III: The Near East, Asia, Australia and the Americas

Aldershot: Ashgate 2009
xii+342pp.
(
Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 8)
 

Although Kierkegaard’s reception was initially more or less limited to Scandinavia, it has for a long time now been a highly international affair. As his writings became translated into the different languages, his reputation spread, and he became read more and more by people increasingly distant from his native Denmark. While in Scandinavia, the attack on the Church in the last years of his life became something of a cause célèbre, later many different aspects of his work became the object of serious scholarly investigation well beyond the original northern borders. As his reputation grew, he was co-opted by a number of different philosophical and religious movements in different contexts throughout the world. The three tomes of the present volume attempt to record the history of this reception according to national and linguistic categories.
 

Tome III is the most geographically diverse, covering the Near East, Asia, Australia and the Americas. The section on the Near East features pioneering articles on the Kierkegaard reception in Israel, Turkey, Iran, and the Arab world. The next section dubbed “Asia and Australia” features articles on the long and rich traditions of Kierkegaard research in Japan and Korea along with the more recent ones in China and Australia. A final section is dedicated to Americas with articles on Canada, the United States, hispanophone South America, Mexico and Brazil.
 

 

 


Johan Ludvig Heiberg:
Philosopher, Littérateur, Dramaturge, and Political Thinker

Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press 2008
xxii+548pp.
(
Danish Golden Age Studies, vol. 5)


The present anthology is dedicated to the varied work of Johan Ludvig Heiberg (1791-1860). While Søren Kierkegaard, Hans Christian Andersen and N.F.S. Grundtvig have long been recognized as leading cultural figures of the Golden Age, worthy of careful study, Heiberg’s reception has been slower, despite the fact that he was a towering figure in his own day. Although Heiberg has been studied for years in Denmark by scholars such as Henning Fenger and Morten Borup, he has not enjoyed the same reputation abroad. Recently, however, Heiberg’s work has begun to catch the eye of international scholars.

This volume is a collection of articles dedicated to the different dimensions of Johan Ludvig Heiberg’s thought. It is an interdisciplinary collection in an attempt to cover as many different aspects of Heiberg’s intellectual activity as possible. Thus, scholars from fields such as philosophy, literature, theology, philology, history, and art history are represented with original contributions.

 

 

 


 

Kierkegaard and the Patristic and Medieval Traditions
Aldershot: Ashgate 2008
xviii+330pp.
(
Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 4)
 

The present volume features articles which employ source-work research to trace Kierkegaard’s understanding and use of authors from the Patristic and Medieval traditions. It covers an extraordinarily long period of time from Cyprian and Tertullian in the second century to Thomas à Kempis in the fifteenth. Despite its heterogeneity and diversity in many aspects, this volume has a clear point of commonality in all its featured sources: Christianity.

Kierkegaard’s relation to the Patristic and Medieval traditions has been a rather neglected area of research in Kierkegaard studies. This is somewhat surprising given the fact that the young Kierkegaard learned about the Patristic authors during his studies at the University of Copenhagen and was clearly fascinated by many aspects of their writings and the conceptions of Christian religiosity found there.

With regard to the medieval tradition, in addition to any number of theological issues, medieval mysticism, medieval art, the medieval church, troubadour poetry and the monastic movement were all themes that exercised Kierkegaard during different periods of his life.

Although far from uncritical, he seems at times to idolize both the Patristic tradition and the Middle Ages as contrastive terms to the corrupt and decadent modern world with its complacent Christianity. While he clearly regards the specific forms of this Medieval appropriation of Christianity to be misguided, he is nonetheless positively disposed toward the general understanding of it as something to be lived and realized by each individual.
 

 


 

 

 



Kierkegaard and his German Contemporaries
Tome I: Philosophy
Aldershot: Ashgate 2007
xviii+379pp.
(
Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 6)

 

This volume explores in detail Kierkegaard’s various relations to his German contemporaries. Kierkegaard read German fluently and made extensive use of the writings of German-speaking authors. Apart from his contemporary Danish sources, the German sources were probably the most important in the development of his thought generally. This volume represents source-work research dedicated to tracing Kierkegaard’s readings and use of the various German-speaking authors in the different fields.

The volume have been divided into three tomes reflecting Kierkegaard’s main areas of interest with regard to the German-speaking sources, namely, philosophy, theology and a more loosely conceived category, which has here been designated “literature and aesthetics.”

The first tome treats the German philosophical influences on Kierkegaard. The dependence of Danish philosophy on German philosophy is beyond question. In an aricle in his Hegelian journal Perseus, the poet, playwright and critic, Johan Ludvig Heiberg (1791-1869) laments the sad state of philosophy in Denmark, while lauding German speculative philosophy. Moreover, Kierkegaard’s lifelong enemy, the theologian Hans Lassen Martensen (1808-84) claims without exaggeration that the Danish systems of philosophy can be regarded as the “disjecta membra” of earlier German systems. All of the major German idealist philosophers made an impact in Denmark: Kant, Fichte, Schelling, and most significantly, Hegel. Kierkegaard was widely read in the German philosophical literature, which he made use of in countless ways throughout his authorship.
 

 


 



Kierkegaard and his German Contemporaries
Tome II: Theology

Aldershot: Ashgate 2007
xii+265pp.
(
Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 6)
 

This volume explores in detail Kierkegaard’s various relations to his German contemporaries. Kierkegaard read German fluently and made extensive use of the writings of German-speaking authors. Apart from his contemporary Danish sources, the German sources were probably the most important in the development of his thought generally. This volume represents source-work research dedicated to tracing Kierkegaard’s readings and use of the various German-speaking authors in the different fields.

The volume have been divided into three tomes reflecting Kierkegaard’s main areas of interest with regard to the German-speaking sources, namely, philosophy, theology and a more loosely conceived category, which has here been designated “literature and aesthetics.”

The second tome of the present volume is dedicated to Kierkegaard’s main theological influences. In theology as well, the German and the Danish traditions had long been closely connected via their common source: Luther. In Kierkegaard’s time the main influence on theology was probably German philosophy and specifically Hegelianism. Most all of the German theologians were in some way in a critical dialogue with this movement. Another important influence was Schleiermacher, who visited Copenhagen in 1833 and was important for several Golden Age thinkers. From his student days Kierkegaard kept abreast of the German theological literature, from which he drew much inspiration.
 

 

 

 


 

Kierkegaard and his German Contemporaries
Tome III: Literature and Aesthetics

Aldershot: Ashgate 2008
xii+322pp.
(
Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 6)
 

This volume explores in detail Kierkegaard’s various relations to his German contemporaries. Kierkegaard read German fluently and made extensive use of the writings of German-speaking authors. Apart from his contemporary Danish sources, the German sources were probably the most important in the development of his thought generally. This volume represents source-work research dedicated to tracing Kierkegaard’s readings and use of the various German-speaking authors in the different fields.

The volume have been divided into three tomes reflecting Kierkegaard’s main areas of interest with regard to the German-speaking sources, namely, philosophy, theology and a more loosely conceived category, which has here been designated “literature and aesthetics.”

This third tome is dedicated to the German literary sources that were significant for Kierkegaard. These articles feature primarily important authors from German classicism and Romanticism. Important forerunners for many of Kierkegaard’s literary motifs and characters can be found in the German literature of the day. His use of pseudonyms and his interest in irony were both profoundly influenced by German Romanticism. Moreover, many of Kierkegaard’s views of criticism and aesthetics were decisively shaped by the work of German authors.
 

 


 

Kierkegaard and his Contemporaries, ed. by Jon Stewart


 

Kierkegaard and his Contemporaries:
The Culture of Golden Age Denmark

Berlin and New York: Verlag Walter de Gruyter 2003
xvi+437pp.
(Kierkegaard Studies. Monograph Series, vol. 10)

 

Interpreting Kierkegaard in the general context of Golden Age Denmark, this interdisciplinary anthology features articles which treat his various relations to his most famous Danish contemporaries. It aims to see them not as minor figures laboring in Kierkegaard’s shadow but rather as significant thinkers and artists in their own right. The articles illuminate both Kierkegaard’s influence on his contemporaries and their varied influences on him. By means of the analyses of these various relations, aspects of Kierkegaard’s authorship are brought into new and insightful perspectives.

 

The featured essays treat some of the most important figures from the time, representing the fields of philosophy, theology, literature, criticism and art. Among the figures explored are Hans Christian Andersen, N.F.S. Grundtvig, Johan Ludvig Heiberg, Hans Christian Ørsted, Jakob Peter Mynster, Hans Lassen Martensen, Poul Martin Møller, Thomasine Gyllembourg, Bertel Thorvaldsen, Johanne Luise Heiberg, Johan Thomas Lundbye, Adam Oehlenschläger, Peder Ludvig Møller, and Frederik Christian Sibbern.
 

Reviews
Kierkegaard and His Contemporaries is as a whole a most welcome contribution to the continuing effort on the part of many scholars to offer accounts of the cultural and intellectual milieu in which Kierkegaard worked that will provide a surer foundation for understanding his works in terms of the norms and expectations of his time. The volume is clearly based on the assumption that a rounded, textured, and subtly nuanced contextualization will contribute significantly to the understanding of his works.”
Steven P. Sondrup, Scandinavian Studies, vol. 76, no. 4, 2004, pp. 562-566.
 

 


 

 


 

The Debate Between Sartre and Merleau-Ponty
Evanston, Illinois: Northwestern University Press 1998
xlvii+634pp.

 

The Debate between Sartre and Merleau-Ponty provides a balanced portrait of the intellectual relationship between these two men. Essays by leading scholars as well as selections from the primary texts of Merleau-Ponty, Sartre, and Simone de Beauvoir address the numerous points of contact and cover the major themes of the debate from the different periods in their shared history.

 

A biographical overview introduces the work and provides a context for the theoretical issues taken up in the articles, and an extensive bibliography suggests further readings to supplement the selections included in the volume.

 

Reviews

“Stewart ambitiously presents twenty-one essays about the similarities and differences between Sartre and Merleau-Ponty, along with six illustrative primary texts by Sartre, Merleau-Ponty, and de Beauvoir. While both men are acknowledged as prominent existential-phenomenological thinkers, the interaction of their thought as students together, coworkers on Les Temps Modernes, and philosophical interlocutors , is often overlooked. Stewart has skilfully chosen essays providing thoughtful insights about the varying nature of their conflict.”
Steven A. Miller, The Review of Metaphysics, vol. 53, no. 4, 2000, pp. 963-965.

 

“The volume is a wonderful tribute to two architects of French existential phenomenology.”
J.S.M., Ethics, vol. 111, no. 1, 2000, p. 214.



________________________



"The Debate between Sartre and Merleau-Ponty both meets and surpasses its two objectives. There is an immense amount of secondary literature on both Sartre and Merleau-Ponty, and this anthology succeeds in bringing together only those articles which illuminate their complex relation. In addition, this anthology serves as an excellent introduction for English-speaking students to the tradition of French phenomenology and existentialism. Such an introduction is welcome in today's intellectual climate, as the popularity of 'post-modern' philosophers typically posits these thinkers as having the first and last word, often resulting in a naive failure to recognize who, or what, these philosopher are reacting against."
Mark Raymond Brown, De philosophia, vol. 1, 1999.


 

 


 

 


 

The Phenomenology of Spirit Reader: Critical and Interpretive Essays
Albany, New York: SUNY Press 1998
xv+507pp.
 

The Phenomenology of Spirit was Hegel’s first major philosophical work and is considered by many to be his masterpiece. Its several hundred pages treat topics as diverse as Greek drama, religion, medieval court culture, natural science, Romanticism, and the Enlightenment. Hegel regarded it as the introduction to his philosophical system as a whole, and it is often thought to be the most accessible work in his otherwise difficult philosophical corpus.

This anthology is a collection of essays on the Phenomenology. It follows Hegel’s table of contents, covering all of the major sections of the work. The main goal guiding the selection of essays was to collect the best articles written on the Phenomenology by distinguished international Hegel scholars and at the same time to provide systematic coverage.

 

Although the essays are all by leading Hegel scholars, none of them presupposes any particular in-depth knowledge of Hegel or German philosophy. The object of the book is thus to make the Phenomenology more accessible to students while serving as an impetus for further Anglo-American Hegel research.

 

Reviews

“Adding to its on-going series of ‘Hegelian Studies,’ SUNY have issued this comprehensive and well organised companion to what is probably the most important and influential volume of the Hegelian corpus: the Phenomenology of Spirit.

Full credit must be given to the editor, Jon Stewart, for the clarity that he has brought to the project, both in terms of its organisational principles and the realisation of its aims and intentions, as well as to his role in the unification of what might have otherwise risked becoming yet another loose ‘patchwork’ of merely vaguely related essays. This sense of a unified whole is in fact no mean feat, given that one of the main aims of the book is to provide, firstly, ‘the most complete collection of essays on the Phenomenology in any language.’ Secondly, it aims to fulfil this remit by drawing from a wide range of sources, providing ‘representative’ insight into the divergent interests in, and receptions of, the Phenomenology in a variety of disciplines and traditions beyond the more restricted concerns of Anglo-American philosophical scholarship.

...The Phenomenology of Spirit Reader, as a well organised, eminently usable and worthwhile addition to the discussion of what Hegel meant, may well play a role, for students and specialists alike, in our attempts to answer the question ‘what does Hegel mean to us?’ ”
Stephen Robinson, Bulletin of the Hegel Society of Great Britain, nos. 39-40, 1999, pp. 112-117.
 

 


 

 

 


 

The Hegel Myths and Legends
Evanston, Illinois: Northwestern University Press 1996
xiii+384pp.
 

For many years, scholars in German idealism have known that a number of the views of Hegel rife in the Anglo-Saxon world are highly inaccurate. However, that knowledge has not penetrated very far beyond specialist circles, and much of Hegel’s reputation continues to be based on the unquestioning acceptance of misconceptions and distortions of his life and work. The essays collected in The Hegel Myths and Legends serve the function of disbusing students and nonspecialists of these misconceptions by exposing these myths for what they are.

Jon Stewart has selected a set of essays that treat and effectively debunk the various Hegel myths and legends. The volume presents contributions from leading American and European scholars of several different generations, each of which treats one or more of the Hegel myths.

The essays offer clear historical accounts of the origin and development of the various misconceptions as well as refutations of them based on the results of contemporary Hegel scholarship. Divided into sections addressing the various myths and augmented by Stewart’s  informative introduction and an extensive bibliography, this collection is of interest to scholars and nonspecialists alike.

Reviews

The Hegel Myths and Legends is a wonderful book to counter prejudices against Hegel’s philosophy. In addition, the essays give insight into why and how the myths were created.…Stewart’s collection of essays should facilitate that Hegel’s philosophy can no longer be dismissed as easily as has been and is still done.”
Erich P. Schellhammer, The Review of Metaphysics, vol. 50, no. 4, 1997, pp. 923-924.

  






 






Miscellaneous Writings by G.W.F. Hegel, ed. by Jon Stewart

 

 





Editions of Primary Texts




Miscellaneous Writings by G.W.F. Hegel,
Evanston, Illinois: Northwestern University Press 2002.
xxxiii+441pp.

 

This anthology, reflecting virtually every stage of G. W. F. Hegel’s life and every area of his interests, provides the most complete picture yet of the intellectual development and activity of this towering figure of philosophy. Previously scattered and often hard to find, the writings collected here are of markedly different genres: introductions, rough drafts, book reviews, poems, speeches, sermons, individual treatises, even student notes and other first-hand reports.

 

By virtue of their heterogeneity, these works bring out the full scope of Hegel’s intellectual interests and activities; often surprising sides of his personality and intellectual character emerge as he plays the unaccustomed roles of poet, priest, reformer, and polemicist.

Reviews

“Stewart’s book is a welcome addition to Hegel translations. His volume collects over thirty short pieces translated by a number of scholars....Stewart organizes writings from throughout Hegel’s lifetime into familiar geographical and chronological groupings that trace his development. The translations exhibit the full range of Hegel’s changing interests and include pieces on religion, politics, history and philosophy....Stewart includes a very useful introduction which parallels the chronological order of the writings and situates each piece in the history of Hegel’s development....Stewart’s greatest service, however, is simply collecting these translations, many of which have been difficult to find. They will be invaluable to English-speaking students of Hegel who want to begin exploring some of the less-traveled paths of his thought.”
Marcos Bisticas-Cocoves, Hegel-Studien, vol. 38, 2003, pp. 140-141.
 



 






 

 


Heiberg’s Perseus and Other Texts
trans. and ed. by Jon Stewart

Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press 2011
xiii+406pp.
(Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 6)

 

The poet and part-time philosopher Johan Ludvig Heiberg published the first issue of his review Perseus, Journal for the Speculative Idea in June of 1837 as a part of his long-standing campaign to convert his Golden Age contemporaries to G.W.F. Hegel’s philosophical system. The journal was created in large part as a result of a dispute that Heiberg had with the editorial board of the prestigious Maanedsskrift for Litteratur about an article that he had submitted. Feeling unfairly persecuted, Heiberg retracted his submission and resolved to found a new philosophical journal of his own, in which his controversial piece could be published. Thus Perseus was born. In his prefatory address to the journal’s readers, Heiberg calls upon the Greek hero Perseus to be the champion for the cause of Hegelian idealism and to do battle with the pernicious Medusa of realism and empiricism.

Although Heiberg’s Hegelian review only appeared in two issues in 1837 and 1838, it was widely read and discussed among Danish students and intellectuals of the time. It was reviewed at length by the philosopher Frederik Christian Sibbern and satirized by Søren Kierkegaard in Prefaces. There can be no doubt that Heiberg’s Perseus represents a landmark in Golden Age culture.


Reviews

"In his efforts to make the central philosophical texts from the Danish Golden Age accessible to international readers, Jon Stewart has now taken on Johan Ludvig Heiberg’s journal Perseus (1837-38). This was the first of three journals that followed Heiberg’s popular Kjøbenhavns flyvende Post (1827-37), all of which had a culturally aristocratic air about them: Perseus, Intelligensblade and Urania. Of particular significance, Perseus was an organ for Hegelian philosophy in Heiberg’s own unique distillation. In his long review of V.H. Rothe’s theological dissertation, which fills the better part of this volume, Heiberg claims that the Hegelian triad is the reflection of the Trinity in the realms of logic, nature and spirit. Philosophy synthesizes these three spheres into a whole and can achieve knowledge of God, whereas both rationalism and orthodoxy, each in its own way, fall into error. This review is an important source for understanding both Heiberg’s philosophy of life and the intellectual climate in Denmark around 1840."

Johnny Kondrup
University of Copenhagen


 





 

Mynster's "Rationalism, Supernaturalism"
and the Debate about Mediation

trans. and ed. by Jon Stewart
Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press 2009
xvi+683pp.
(Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 5)

 

G.W.F. Hegel’s so-called speculative logic was revolutionary since it attacked the basic laws of Aristotelian logic—the laws of contradiction and excluded middle—which stood as the foundation for the field for well over a millennium. He replaced these laws with the principle of mediation, which he used to redefine all the key terms of the discipline.

In the 1830s this highly controversial theory was attacked by a number of philosophers in Germany and Prussia. These debates spilled over into Denmark in the late 1830s and early 1840s and represent one of the signal episodes in the Danish Hegel reception.

The present volume includes the main texts in this controversy. The debate proper was initiated by the article “Rationalism, Supernaturalism” by the theologian Jakob Peter Mynster, who attacked Hegel’s criticism of the law of excluded middle. The poet, Johan Ludvig Heiberg and the then young theologian, Hans Lassen Martensen then came to Hegel’s defense with articles which responded to Mynster’s charges.

Other interlocutors in the discussion were the philosopher, Frederik Christian Sibbern, and the religious writer, Søren Kierkegaard. There can be no doubt that Kierkegaard’s frequent critical discussions of mediation throughout his authorship were significantly influenced by these debates.

 

 

Reviews

"Bishop Mynster is chiefly known to history in the mirror of Kierkegaard’s attack on establishment Christianity, in which he played the part of the quintessential Churchman, selling out the gospel for the sake of privilege and preferment. Yet, as Kierkegaard himself acknowledged, Mynster ‘carried a generation.’ To his admirers he combined charm and piety, but as this collection shows, he was a man of considerable intellectual power, who engaged contemporary philosophers on equal terms. Mynster’s defence of supernaturalism would not win the day, but the documents assembled here open an extraordinary window onto one of the most focused, passionate and still relevant debates of nineteenth-century Danish thought. An invaluable resource for Kierkegaard scholars, this anthology constitutes a compelling profile of a classic encounter between theology and philosophy."

George Pattison
Oxford University

 

 


 


 

Heiberg’s Contingency Regarded from the Point
of View of Logic and Other Texts

Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press 2008
xvi+457pp.
(Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 4)

 

 

Inspired by G.W.F. Hegel’s system, Johan Ludvig Heiberg authored a series of essays and monographs on different philosophical issues in both Danish and German; these works began after his famous encounter with Hegel in Berlin in 1824 and continued for the next two decades.

The present volume features Heiberg’s early work, Contingency Regarded from the Point of View of Logic (1825), which represents a pseudoHegelian account of the categories of contingency and necessity. Two years later Heiberg published a sequel to this treatise, entitled, “Nemesis. A Popular-Philosophical Investigation.” This work attempts to demonstrate that even though we today no longer believe in Nemesis as a goddess who has control over our lives, nevertheless we very often make use of the concept of nemesis without knowing it.

The present volume also includes several other philosophical and literary articles primarily from Heiberg’s journal Kjøbenhavns flyvende Post. These articles, which date from between 1825 and 1843, serve as a useful introduction to the different aspects of Heiberg’s philosophical thinking and supplement his more extensive monographs in this field.

 

 

Reviews

"With this selection of Danish Golden Age texts centered on J.L. Heiberg’s philosophical writings and cultural critiques, Jon Stewart treats the reader to a variety of youthful interventions by the protagonist. Most of the chosen pieces date from the 1820s, and most all of them sport an argumentative agility, if not a zealous systematizing to no end. Cool Hegelian dialectics runs from cover to cover, from the title piece on contingency through reflections on language, nature, and symbolism to even “a few words about the infinite.” Yet for all his dexterous dialectical finger exercises, Heiberg rarely fails to intersperse his logical discourse with poetic imagery and familiar sayings. Professor Sibbern praises his pedagogy, and so will this volume’s readers praise the editor for having brought to light in crisp and clear English such a coherent assemblage of illustrious products made in the Copenhagen of J.L. Heiberg."

Poul Houe
University of Minnesota


 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Heiberg’s Introductory Lecture to the Logic Course
and Other Texts

Copenhagen: C.A. Reitzel’s Publishing House 2007
xvii+334pp.
(Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 3)



This volume features one of Johan Ludvig Heiberg’s best philosophical works, the Introductory Lecture to the Logic Course, which was originally given as a lecture in 1834 and then published in 1835. This work is one of the clearest statements of Heiberg’s Hegelian idealism. Here he makes a case for the primacy of philosophy over, for example, religion or the natural sciences by appealing to a theory of categories. Following Hegel’s model, Heiberg places philosophical knowing higher than religious knowing.

Despite the title of the work, Heiberg is not concerned solely with logic or metaphysics. He also treats, for example, philosophy of language and aesthetics, setting up a cursory taxonomy of forms of poetry. This text further contains his famous appeal to “the demand of the age,” which was so often the object of Kierkegaard’s satire in works such as Prefaces and Stages on Life’s Way
.

 

Reviews

"This third volume of Stewart’s carefully edited translations of J. L. Heiberg’s writings will be required reading for all who do research on nineteenth-century Danish philosophy and especially for those studying Kierkegaard’s Concluding Unscientific Postscript. Here for the first time easily available in English are some of the primary texts, for example, from Heiberg and F. C. Sibbern on philosophy and the logical system and from H. L. Martensen on the importance of doubting everything. The excuses that these essays and reviews are hard to find, or that they are in Danish, will now sound even weaker than they did before. No doubt many Hegel scholars and Kierkegaard scholars will continue to disagree, but, whether they agree or disagree, they will be supporting their views pro and con with citations from this book."

Andrew Burgess
University of New Mexico

 

________________________ 


Heiberg’s Introductory Lecture to the Logic Course and Other Texts is the third volume in the series “Texts from Golden Age Denmark” published by C.A. Reitzel…. [Heiberg’s Introductory Lecture was] the initial lecture to the course that Heiberg taught at the Royal Military College in Copenhagen, [and] the published pamphlet was not only intended as instructional material for Heiberg’s students but also as a response to his critics…. Included in this volume as well is a translation of a selection from Kierkegaard’s Concluding Unscientific Postscript…. [T]his selection…emphasizes Kierkegaard’s position as a respondent to Heiberg’s version of Hegel and situates him alongside the other critics. In doing so Kierkegaard emerges more forcefully as an interlocutor, as one among others immersed in the philosophical debates of the day as opposed to a lone and solitary thinker. In comparison with the Hongs' translation, Stewart’s is remarkably readable and clear. It has replaced many of the awkward formulations and general wordiness of the Hong translation and thus clarified some of the denseness of Kierkegaard’s prose…. The three volumes on Heiberg’s introduction of Hegel’s ideas into Denmark and the ensuing debates constitute a particularly rich and thick description of the arrival of Hegelianism as a contested by integral component to the Danish Golden Age. As with the other volumes in the series, there is an impressive amount of bibliographic and reference material here. From the several indices and bibliographies to the excellent introduction and singularly helpful explanatory notes, the volume contains a substantial collection of information above and beyond the translations themselves. Stewart has taken great care in positioning each of the chosen texts in their historical as well as philosophical context and the reader necessarily comes away having been given a privileged window into a central concern of the Danish Golden Age. These volumes are thus not only the definitive source of Heiberg’s Hegelian material in English but also function as gateways to further research into the Danish Golden Age and its historical and cultural moment.”
Nathaniel Kramer, Scandinavian Studies, vol. 80, no. 2, 2008, pp. 254-256.
 

 


 

 


 

Heiberg’s Speculative Logic and Other Texts
Copenhagen: C.A. Reitzel’s Publishing House 2006
xviii+387pp.

(Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 2)
 

This volume features Johan Ludvig Heiberg’s most extensive treatment of logic, namely, his Outline of the Philosophy of Philosophy or Speculative Logic from 1832. This work was originally used as a textbook for Heiberg’s students at the Royal Military College. It follows closely G.W.F. Hegel’s main statement on the subject, the Science of Logic. This work foreshadows a number of later Danish discussions about issues related to Hegel’s logic, for example, the question of a presuppositionless beginning, mediation, movement in logic, the validity of the law of excluded middle, and finally the relation of philosophy to religion. Heiberg’s Speculative Logic was the first of a series of Danish works and commentaries on Hegel’s Science of Logic that appeared throughout the late 1830s and 1840s.

 

 

Reviews

"An understanding of Heiberg and his circle of supporters and critics is essential to anyone seeking an understanding of the Danish Golden Age, which includes, but is not limited to, Kierkegaard and his context. Stewart has now produced English translations of a generous selection of Heiberg's most important works as well as pieces by the critics who responded to Heiberg and to whom Heiberg in turn responded. If the intellectual heart of the Danish Golden Age is to be found anywhere, it is in these texts. And as a result of Stewart's Herculean labors, these materials are now available to the scholarly world in English. Since English has become the de facto international language of much scholarship—the Latin of our age—and Danish is fated to remain a minor language, we are greatly indebted to Jon Stewart for this signal achievement. Stewart's translations will become standard texts in all respectable scholarly libraries."

 

Bruce H. Kirmmse

Connecticut College

 

________________________


“As with the first volume, the basis for the selection of material is to provide the philosophical background for the entry of Hegelianism into Denmark during the nineteenth century. Heiberg was instrumental in the introduction of Hegel, and Heiberg’s role as the cultural luminary of nineteenth-century Denmark suggests a broader Hegelian influence on the entire period. Stewart’s translations thus provide an invaluable source for understanding Denmark’s Golden Age and the cultural, historical, aesthetic, and philosophical currents circulating during the period. The immediate value of these translations is undoubtedly a better historicized understanding of Kierkegaard. Kierkegaard has too often been viewed, especially in the Anglophone world, as reacting directly to Hegel. Stewart, however, presents the much more nuanced view that Kierkegaard is responding to Heiberg’s Hegel as well as to the philosophical and religious debates surrounding the Danish reception of Hegel. Stewart’s translations of reviews and exchanges in the newspapers also provide a unique look into the culture of nineteenth-century Denmark and the dynamics of reception and exchange that took place in the newspapers. These translations offer, thus, a richer and more complex view of the Danish Golden Age than we have had up to this point…. As with the first volume, Stewart’s scrupulous attention to detail merits special attention. The introductory essay to the volume helpfully situates the significance of Heiberg’s Outline both in terms of its reception in Denmark as well as its relation to Hegel’s Science of Logic and Encyclopedia of the Philosophical Sciences. The extensive “Explanatory Notes” that conclude each of the selections provide valuable information on the background, textual history, references and allusions, and relationships between Hegel’s own thought and Heiberg’s interpretation. Throughout, Stewart also pays close attention to the terminological differences of each of the three languages and includes a list comparing the German, Danish, and accepted English equivalents of Hegelian terminology. Stewart has also provided a substantial bibliography divided into works referred to in his introduction and the explanatory notes by Danish and German authors…. In short, Stewart’s critical apparatus make these volumes into far more than simple translations. They provide a significantly comprehensive and complex view into nineteenth-century Denmark.”
Nathaniel Kramer, Scandinavian Studies, vol. 78, no. 3, 2006, pp. 372-375.
 

 


 

 

Heiberg's On the Significance of Philosophy for the Present Age and Other Texts, ed. by Jon Stewart


 

Heiberg’s On the Significance of Philosophy for the
Present Age  and Other Texts

Copenhagen: C.A. Reitzel’s Publishing House 2005
xxii+467pp.
(Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 1)

 

This volume presents one of the philosophical classics of the Danish Golden Age: Johan Ludvig Heiberg’s On the Significance of Philosophy for the Present Age,

a text which appeared at C.A. Reitzel's Publishing House in 1833. In this work Heiberg gives his impassioned diagnosis of what he perceived as the great crisis of relativism and nihilism of his day. His proposed solution is that thinkers, artists and scholars should take refuge in Hegel’s philosophy, which restores truth and beauty to their proper place.

This volume also contains a translation of Heiberg’s “Autobiographical Fragments” in which he recounts his trip to Berlin where he met Hegel in person and attended his lectures. It is here that Heiberg gives the dramatic account of his philosophical revelation and conversion to Hegel’s philosophy.

 

 

Reviews

"In presenting to an English-speaking audience the works of one of Kierkgaard's arch-opponents and a constant target of polemics in much of what he wrote, this volume not only helps us to see the point of many of Kierkegaard's allusions but affords us more than a glimpse of an undoubted genius in his own right. Johan Ludvig Heiberg was a scholar, philosopher, and cultural critic who, in his heyday, controlled much of Copenhagen's cultural life. It was with his unusually lucid version of Hegelian philosophy that Kierkegaard and his Danish contemporaries had to come to grips. For this volume and to its editor, for his well-judged selection and excellent translations, we owe a considerable debt."

Alastair Hannay
University of Oslo
 

________________________ 


“The importance of Hegel and Danish Hegelianism for Kierkegaard, for example, has long been recognized…but little of significance has been attempted to understand Hegel’s importance for Heiberg as well as for the Danish Golden Age in general. Thus, this volume marks an important return to the historical and philosophical underpinnings of nineteenth-century Denmark…. This volume, as well as the other translations forthcoming [in this series] will undoubtedly change the way the Golden Age is taught to non-Danish speakers. Access to Heiberg in the English language, to this point, has been limited to a small handful of plays and thus has prevented any significant treatment of primary texts. With the publication of this volume, Heiberg’s significance for the Danish Golden Age as well as Hegel’s can be assessed and given its proper historical due for the benefit for non-Danish speakers. The debate, as presented by Stewart, also provides an important context for understanding the general intellectual and religious crisis of the Danish Golden Age as well as insight into nineteenth-century Copenhagen’s bourgeoning modernity. In doing so, an especially beneficial effect is the foregrounding of the important role of Danish newspapers and journals for dialogue and debate. In sum, Stewart’s translations, long overdue and very much welcomed, provide an invaluable tool for further investigation of the Danish nineteenth-century for both researcher and instructor alike.”
Nathaniel Kramer, Scandinavian Studies, vol. 78, no. 1, 2006, pp. 106-109.
 


 

 

 




 


Kierkegaard Bibliography, Tome I, Albanian to Dutch, ed. by Peter Šajda and Jon Stewart, Aldershot: Ashgate 2016. (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 19.)

 

Kierkegaard Bibliography, Tome II, English, ed. by Peter Šajda and Jon Stewart, London and New York: Routledge 2016. (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 19.)

 

Kierkegaard Bibliography, Tome III, Estonian to Hebrew, ed. by Peter Šajda and Jon Stewart, London and New York: Routledge 2016. (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 19.)

 

Kierkegaard Bibliography, Tome IV, Hungarian to Korean, ed. by Peter Šajda and Jon Stewart, London and New York: Routledge 2016. (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 19.)

 

Kierkegaard Bibliography, Tome V, Latvian to Ukrainian, ed. by Peter Šajda and Jon Stewart, London and New York: Routledge 2016. (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 19.)

 

Kierkegaard Bibliography, Tome VI, Figures A-H, ed. by Peter Šajda and Jon Stewart, London and New York: Routledge 2016. (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 19.)

 

Kierkegaard Bibliography, Tome VII, Figures I-Z, ed. by Peter Šajda and Jon Stewart, London and New York: Routledge 2016. (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 19.)


________________________ 


 

The long tradition of Kierkegaard studies has made it impossible for individual scholars to have a complete overview of the vast field of Kierkegaard research. The large and ever increasing number of publications on Kierkegaard in the languages of the world can be simply bewildering even for experienced scholars. The present work constitutes a systematic bibliography which aims to help students and researchers navigate the seemingly endless mass of publications. The volume is divided into two large sections. Part I, which covers Tomes I-V, is dedicated to individual bibliographies organized according to specific language. This includes extensive bibliographies of works on Kierkegaard in some 41 different languages. Part II, which covers Tomes VI-VII, is dedicated to shorter, individual bibliographies organized according to specific figures who are in some way relevant for Kierkegaard. The goal has been to create the most exhaustive bibliography of Kierkegaard literature possible, and thus the bibliography is not limited to any specific time period but instead spans the entire history of Kierkegaard studies.

















Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 2016, ed. by Heiko Schulz, Jon Stewart and Karl Verstrynge in cooperation with Peter Sajda, Berlin and Boston: De Gruyter 2016. VIII + 324pp.


Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 2015, ed. by Heiko Schulz, Jon Stewart and Karl Verstrynge in cooperation with Peter Sajda, Berlin and Boston: De Gruyter 2015. IX + 416pp.


Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 2014, ed. by Heiko Schulz, Jon Stewart and Karl Verstrynge in cooperation with Peter Šajda, Berlin and Boston: De Gruyter 2014. VIII + 363pp.


Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 2013, ed. by Heiko Schulz, Jon Stewart and Karl Verstrynge in cooperation with Peter Šajda, Berlin and Boston: De Gruyter 2013. IX + 502pp.


Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 2012, ed. by Heiko Schulz, Jon Stewart and Karl Verstrynge in cooperation with Peter Šajda, Berlin and Boston: De Gruyter 2012. VIII + 518pp.


Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 2011, ed. by Heiko Schulz, Jon Stewart and Karl Verstrynge in cooperation with Peter Šajda, Berlin and Boston: De Gruyter 2011. IX + 489pp.


Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 2004, ed. by Hermann Deuser and Niels Jørgen Cappelørn, Hermann Deuser and Jon Stewart, Berlin and New York: Walter de Gruyter 2004. X + 635pp.

 

Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 2003, ed. by Hermann Deuser and Niels Jørgen Cappelørn, Hermann Deuser and Jon Stewart, Berlin and New York: Walter de Gruyter 2003. XI + 556pp.

 

Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 2002, ed. by Hermann Deuser and Niels Jørgen Cappelørn, Hermann Deuser and Jon Stewart, Berlin and New York: Walter de Gruyter 2002. IX + 507pp.

 

Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 2001, ed. by Hermann Deuser and Niels Jørgen Cappelørn, Hermann Deuser and Jon Stewart, Berlin and New York: Walter de Gruyter 2001. XI + 493pp.

 

Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 2000, ed. by Hermann Deuser and Niels Jørgen Cappelørn, Hermann Deuser and Jon Stewart, Berlin and New York: Walter de Gruyter 2000. XI + 447pp.


________________________ 



   Since the Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook was first published in 1996, it has served as the leading periodical in the
field. Starting in 2011 the
Yearbook has been a peer-reviewed publication open to submissions by all Kierkegaard scholars. The Yearbook is published on behalf of the Søren Kierkegaard Research Centre at the University of Copenhagen. The goal of the Yearbook is to advance Kierkegaard studies by encouraging top-level scholarship in
the field. The editorial and advisory boards are deeply committed to creating a genuinely international forum for
publication which integrates the many different traditions of Kierkegaard studies and brings them into a constructive
and fruitful dialogue. To this end the
Yearbook publishes articles from all related fields (philosophy, theology, literary
studies etc.) in English, French and German.



 














The Auction Catalogue of Kierkegaard's Library
ed. by Katalin Nun, Gerhard Schreiber and Jon Stewart
Aldershot: Ashgate 2015
xvii+170pp.
(
Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 20)


For years The Auction Catalogue of Kierkegaard’s library has been an invaluable resource for scholars interested in source-work studies. However, the inaccurate and incomplete bibliographical information contained in the catalogue have been impediments to research.

This new and improved edition of The Auction Catalogue will differ from the previous ones in a number of significant respects. Its primary goal is to systematically correct the erroneous bibliographical information contained in the previous editions. An attempt will be made to compare the information given in the catalogue with that given on the title pages of the various books.


 



 

Kierkegaard's Pseudonyms
ed. by Katalin Nun and Jon Stewart
Aldershot: Ashgate 2015
(
Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 17)


One of the elements that many readers admire in Kierkegaard’s skill as a writer consists in his ability to create different voices and perspectives in his works. Instead of unilaterally presenting clear-cut doctrines and theses, he confronts the reader with different personalities and figures who all espouse different views. One important aspect of this play of perspectives is Kierkegaard’s controversial use of pseudonyms.

 

The present volume is dedicated to exploring the different pseudonyms and authorial voices in Kierkegaard’s authorship. The working assumption is that there is something unique and special about each pseudonym. The articles featured here try to explore each pseudonymous author as a kind of literary figure and to explain what kind of a person is at issue in each of the pseudonymous works. The hope is that by taking seriously each of these figures as individuals, we will be able to gain new insights into the texts which they are ostensibly responsible for.

 

 

 

Kierkegaard's Literary Figures and Motifs
ed. by Katalin Nun and Jon Stewart

Tome I: Agamemnon to Guadalquivir

Aldershot: Ashgate 2015
xix+296pp.
(
Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 16)


While Kierkegaard is perhaps known best as a religious thinker and philosopher, there is an unmistakable literary element in his writings. He often explains complex concepts and ideas by using literary figures and motifs that he could assume his readers would have some familiarity with. This dimension of his thought has served to make his writings far more popular than those of other philosophers and theologians, but at the same time it has made their interpretation more complex. Kierkegaard readers are generally aware of his interest in figures such as Faust or the Wandering Jew, but they rarely have a full appreciation of the vast extent of his use of characters from different literary periods and traditions. The present volume is dedicated to the treatment of the variety of literary figures and motifs used by Kierkegaard.

 

 

 

Kierkegaard's Literary Figures and Motifs
ed. by Katalin Nun and Jon Stewart

Tome II: Gulliver to Zerlina

Aldershot: Ashgate 2015
xv+267pp.
(
Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 16)


While Kierkegaard is perhaps known best as a religious thinker and philosopher, there is an unmistakable literary element in his writings. He often explains complex concepts and ideas by using literary figures and motifs that he could assume his readers would have some familiarity with. This dimension of his thought has served to make his writings far more popular than those of other philosophers and theologians, but at the same time it has made their interpretation more complex. Kierkegaard readers are generally aware of his interest in figures such as Faust or the Wandering Jew, but they rarely have a full appreciation of the vast extent of his use of characters from different literary periods and traditions. The present volume is dedicated to the treatment of the variety of literary figures and motifs used by Kierkegaard.


 




 

Kierkegaard's Concepts
ed. by Steven Emmanuel, William McDonald and Jon Stewart
Tome VI: Salvation to Writing

Aldershot: Ashgate 2015
(
Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 15)

Kierkegaard’s Concepts is a comprehensive, multi-volume survey of the key concepts and categories that inform Kierkegaard’s writings. Each article is a substantial, original piece of scholarship, which discusses the etymology and lexical meaning of the relevant Danish term, traces the development of the concept over the course of the authorship, and explains how it functions in the wider context of Kierkegaard’s thought. Concepts have been selected on the basis of their importance for Kierkegaard’s contributions to philosophy, theology, the social sciences, literature and aesthetics, thereby making this volume an ideal reference work for students and scholars in a wide range of disciplines.

 

 




 

Kierkegaard's Concepts
ed. by Steven Emmanuel, William McDonald and Jon Stewart
Tome V: Objectivity to Sacrifice
Aldershot: Ashgate 2015
xvii+280pp.
(
Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 15)


While Kierkegaard is perhaps known best as a religious thinker and philosopher, there is an unmistakable literary element in his writings. He often explains complex concepts and ideas by using literary figures and motifs that he could assume his readers would have some familiarity with. This dimension of his thought has served to make his writings far more popular than those of other philosophers and theologians, but at the same time it has made their interpretation more complex. Kierkegaard readers are generally aware of his interest in figures such as Faust or the Wandering Jew, but they rarely have a full appreciation of the vast extent of his use of characters from different literary periods and traditions. The present volume is dedicated to the treatment of the variety of literary figures and motifs used by Kierkegaard.


 

 

Kierkegaard's Concepts
ed. by Steven Emmanuel, William McDonald and Jon Stewart
Tome IV: Individual to Novel

Aldershot: Ashgate 2014
xvii+252pp.
(
Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 15)

While Kierkegaard is perhaps known best as a religious thinker and philosopher, there is an unmistakable literary element in his writings. He often explains complex concepts and ideas by using literary figures and motifs that he could assume his readers would have some familiarity with. This dimension of his thought has served to make his writings far more popular than those of other philosophers and theologians, but at the same time it has made their interpretation more complex. Kierkegaard readers are generally aware of his interest in figures such as Faust or the Wandering Jew, but they rarely have a full appreciation of the vast extent of his use of characters from different literary periods and traditions. The present volume is dedicated to the treatment of the variety of literary figures and motifs used by Kierkegaard.


 

 

Kierkegaard's Concepts
ed. by Steven Emmanuel, William McDonald and Jon Stewart
Tome III: Envy to Incognito

Aldershot: Ashgate 2014
xvii+236pp.
(
Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 15)


While Kierkegaard is perhaps known best as a religious thinker and philosopher, there is an unmistakable literary element in his writings. He often explains complex concepts and ideas by using literary figures and motifs that he could assume his readers would have some familiarity with. This dimension of his thought has served to make his writings far more popular than those of other philosophers and theologians, but at the same time it has made their interpretation more complex. Kierkegaard readers are generally aware of his interest in figures such as Faust or the Wandering Jew, but they rarely have a full appreciation of the vast extent of his use of characters from different literary periods and traditions. The present volume is dedicated to the treatment of the variety of literary figures and motifs used by Kierkegaard.


 

 

Kierkegaard's Concepts
ed. by Steven Emmanuel, William McDonald and Jon Stewart
Tome II: Classicism to Enthusiasm

Aldershot: Ashgate 2014
xvii+241pp.
(
Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 15)


While Kierkegaard is perhaps known best as a religious thinker and philosopher, there is an unmistakable literary element in his writings. He often explains complex concepts and ideas by using literary figures and motifs that he could assume his readers would have some familiarity with. This dimension of his thought has served to make his writings far more popular than those of other philosophers and theologians, but at the same time it has made their interpretation more complex. Kierkegaard readers are generally aware of his interest in figures such as Faust or the Wandering Jew, but they rarely have a full appreciation of the vast extent of his use of characters from different literary periods and traditions. The present volume is dedicated to the treatment of the variety of literary figures and motifs used by Kierkegaard.


 

 

Kierkegaard's Concepts
ed. by Steven Emmanuel, William McDonald and Jon Stewart
Tome I: Absolute to Church

Aldershot: Ashgate 2013
xxi+214pp.
(
Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 15)


While Kierkegaard is perhaps known best as a religious thinker and philosopher, there is an unmistakable literary element in his writings. He often explains complex concepts and ideas by using literary figures and motifs that he could assume his readers would have some familiarity with. This dimension of his thought has served to make his writings far more popular than those of other philosophers and theologians, but at the same time it has made their interpretation more complex. Kierkegaard readers are generally aware of his interest in figures such as Faust or the Wandering Jew, but they rarely have a full appreciation of the vast extent of his use of characters from different literary periods and traditions. The present volume is dedicated to the treatment of the variety of literary figures and motifs used by Kierkegaard.




   The Authenticity of Faith in Kierkegaard’s Philosophy, ed. by Tamar Aylat-Yaguri and Jon Stewart,
Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing 2013. xviii+ 110.



When he heard the voice that ordered him to sacrifice his son, was Abraham deluded? When is faith merely a
form of self-deception? The existential challenge of attaining and preserving faith is as difficult today as ever
before and perhaps even more so in a scientifically, technologically oriented culture. Faith can turn into
inauthenticity as easily today as in Kierkegaard’s era. This book presents Kierkegaard’s illuminating responses
to the existentially haunting questions of faith and authenticity.

________________________


 

The Authenticity of Faith approaches Kierkegaard through a refreshing combination of Jewish and non-Jewish philosophical approaches, representing a unique conversation between established experts and others. As well as familiar questions concerning the leap and the Kierkegaard/Hegel debate, this collection offers valuable insights into questions of self-deception, grace, and Kierkegaard’s relation to Judaism.”

George Pattison, School of Critical Studies, University of Glasgow

 

“There is no one better than Kierkegaard at illuminating the human proclivity for self-deception. This collection is peerless in its unraveling of Kierkegaard’s complicated views on the self-hoodwinking process.”

Gordon D. Marino, Hong Kierkegaard Library, St. Olaf College



 


 

Kierkegaard and the Bible
ed. by Lee C. Barrett and Jon Stewart
Tome I: The Old Testament
Aldershot: Ashgate 2010
xix+321pp.
(
Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 1)


The articles in this volume all explore Kierkegaard’s complex use of the Bible, a use that pervades and sometimes even structures his literature. The authors of these essays use source-critical research and the tools of many different disciplines, ranging from literary criticism to theology and biblical studies, to situate Kierkegaard’s appropriation of the biblical material in his cultural and intellectual context. The essays seek to identify the possible sources that may have influenced his understanding and employment of Scripture, and to describe the debates about the Bible that may have shaped, perhaps indirectly, his attitudes toward Scripture. The authors also pay close attention to Kierkegaard’s actual hermeneutic practice, carefully analyzing the implicit interpretive moves that he makes as well as his more explicit statements about the significance of various biblical passages. This close reading of Kierkegaard’s texts enables the authors to elucidate the unique and sometimes odd features of his frequent appeals to Scripture.

Because the Christian canon with which Kierkegaard wrestled was and is composed of two different testaments, this volume devotes one tome to the Old Testament and a second tome to the New Testament. The canonically disputed literature of the Apocrypha is considered in the volume on the Old Testament.

Although Kierkegaard certainly cited the Old Testament much less frequently than he did the New, passages and themes from the Old Testament do occupy a position of startling importance in his writings. Old Testament characters such as Abraham and Job often play crucial and even decisive roles in his texts. Snatches of Old Testament wisdom figure prominently in his edifying literature. The vocabulary and cadences of the Psalms saturate his expression of the range of human passions from joy to despair. The essays in this first tome seek to elucidate the crucial rhetorical uses to which he put key passages from the Old Testament, the sources that influenced him to do this, and his reasons for doing so.

 

Reviews

“Martin Luther said, ‘Oratio, meditatio, tentatio facit theologum,’ that is, the proper way to grasp Holy Scripture is through prayer upon the text, meditation upon the text, and agonizingly realizing the text in one’s own life. Kierkegaard’s approach to Holy Scripture especially mirrors the latter, as revealed in Kierkegaard and the Bible, Tome I, The Old Testament, edited by Lee C. Barrett and Jon Stewart….This excellent compendium from scholars around the world shows that while Kierkegaard was fully aware of the increasingly academic and critical approaches to the Bible, his own hermeneutic remained devotional and agonizingly subjective….In the midst of the rise of the historical-critical method in Kierkegaard’s academic setting, Kierkegaard responds not with Fundamentalist retort, but with the existential concern of the Pietists and Luther before an exacting God. This excellent tome on Kierkegaard’s approach to the Old Testament resounds with Luther’s hermeneutic rule: ‘tentatio facit theologum.’ ”
David Lawrence Coe, Søren Kierkegaard Newsletter, no. 58, November 2011, pp. 6-7.


________________________



“This excellent collection of essays brings together the best contemporary Kierkegaard scholarship. Kierkegaard’s varied treatments of Scripture are analyzed across the expanse of his many pseudonymous literary works and his extensive journals (in which one often finds his most resolved theological views). Key biblical figures such as Adam, Abraham, Moses, David, Solomon and Job are read afresh through Kierkegaard’s eyes, penetrating beyond the old familiarity of characters and narratives to impact the reader as an individual, divorced from extraneous academic barriers. Though this first Tome focuses on the Old Testament, inevitably there is frequent reflection upon the New Testament, as befits Kierkegaard’s Lutheran hermeneutic. This volume combines superb primary research and exegetical content of Kierkegaard’s insights, interspersed with key biographical and historical details that had a significant impact upon his life and thought, such as his academic education in Copenhagen, his broken engagement, and his outspoken criticism of the Danish National Church. Kierkegaard’s re-telling of the Biblical narratives, in seeking to remove the barriers between reader and text, immerse the individual in the midst of the biblical material. This is a valuable resource not only for charting and reanalyzing Kierkegaard’s philosophy in light of Scripture, but for reanalyzing one’s own.”
Aaron Edwards, Theological Book Review, vol. 22, no. 2, 2010, pp. 3-4.





 



Kierkegaard and the Bible
ed. by Lee C. Barrett and Jon Stewart
Tome II: The New Testament
Aldershot: Ashgate 2010
xix+321pp.
(
Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 1)
 

As with the Old Testament, Kierkegaard was aware of new developments in New Testament scholarship, and troubled by them. Because these scholarly projects generated alternative understandings of the significance of Jesus, they impinged directly on his own work. It was crucial for Kierkegaard that Jesus is presented as both the enactment of God’s reconciliation with humanity and as the prototype for humanity to emulate. Consequently, Kierkegaard had to struggle with the proper way to persuasively explicate the significance of Jesus in a situation of decreasing academic consensus about Jesus. He also had to contend with contested interpretations of James and Paul, two biblical authors vital for his work. As a result, Kierkegaard ruminated about the proper way to appropriate the New Testament and used material from it carefully and deliberately. The authors in the present New Testament tome seek to clarify different dimensions of Kierkegaard’s interpretive theory and practice as he sought to avoid the twin pitfalls of academic skepticism and passionless biblical traditionalism.

 

Reviews

“Lee C. Barrett and Jon Stewart have provided for the international community of Kierkegaard scholars a much needed work on Kierkegaard and the Bible, Vol. I of Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Research, which is under the editorship of Stewart….The contributors to this volume come from a wide geographical range of countries and various kinds of institutions….Each author in the volume has written with keenness of mind and heart about Kierkegaard and his approach to the Bible. The book makes a very significant contribution to Kierkegaard and biblical scholarship. May it receive the kind of attention in the scholarly community it so richly deserves.”
Brian C. Barlow, Søren Kierkegaard Newsletter, no. 58, November 2011, pp. 8-9.
 

 


 


Kierkegaard and the Greek World
ed. by Jon Stewart and Katalin Nun
Tome I: Socrates and Plato
Aldershot: Ashgate 2010
xix+321pp.
(
Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 2)
 

The present volume features articles that employ source-work research to trace Kierkegaard’s understanding and use of authors from the Greek tradition. The articles treat a series of figures of varying importance in Kierkegaard’s authorship, ranging from early Greek poets to late Classical philosophical schools. In general it can be said that the Greeks collectively constitute one of the single most important bodies of sources for Kierkegaard’s thought. He studied Greek from an early age and was profoundly inspired by what might be called the Greek spirit. Although he is generally considered a Christian thinker, he was nonetheless consistently drawn back to the Greeks for ideas and impulses on any number of topics. He frequently contrasts ancient Greek philosophy, with its emphasis on the lived experience of the individual in daily life, with the abstract German philosophy that was in vogue during his own time. It has been argued that he modeled his work on that of the ancient Greek thinkers specifically in order to contrast his own activity with that of his contemporaries.

This volume has been organized so as to reflect the full spectrum of Kierkegaard’s Greek sources. Tome I is dedicated to the different pictures of Socrates. It contains a series of articles on Plato, who is clearly his main Greek source in general. In addition, a second section features articles on Xenophon and Aristophanes, the other ancient sources of Socrates discussed by Kierkegaard. A third section contains articles that treat the reception of the figure of Socrates in the Germanophone world and in Denmark respectively.

 

Reviews

“This exciting collection of essays examines Kierkegaard’s engagement with, and debt to Greek philosophy….Kierkegaard was shaped by Socrates from the beginning, and continually looked to Socrates (primarily as portrayed by Plato) as a role model and an inspiration, as well as for specific concepts, themes and ideas; Kierkegaard without Socrates is simply inconceivable, and yet it seems as if this relationship is practically ignored. These essays begin to redress this imbalance in Kierkegaard scholarship, by examining Kierkegaard’s relationship with Socrates, the sources he used to develop his view of Socrates, and what he did with his Socrates once he had him….In addition to the essays, the book contains cumulative bibliographies of the relevant writings owned by Kierkegaard, as well as modern secondary literature referenced by the essayists themselves. This book is certain to be useful to anyone doing research on Kierkegaard and Socrates; but more importantly, the essays explore concepts that Kierkegaard took from Plato and Socrates and made his own, so anyone wishing to understand Kierkegaard better will profit from this book regardless of prior background in the Greeks.”
Glenn Kirkconnell, Søren Kierkegaard Newsletter, no. 58, November 2011, pp. 10-11.
 

 


 


Kierkegaard and the Greek World
ed. by Jon Stewart and Katalin Nun
Tome II: Aristotle and Other Greek Authors
Aldershot: Ashgate 2010
xv+335pp.
(
Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 2)
 

The present volume features articles that employ source-work research to trace Kierkegaard’s understanding and use of authors from the Greek tradition. The articles treat a series of figures of varying importance in Kierkegaard’s authorship, ranging from early Greek poets to late Classical philosophical schools. In general it can be said that the Greeks collectively constitute one of the single most important bodies of sources for Kierkegaard’s thought. He studied Greek from an early age and was profoundly inspired by what might be called the Greek spirit. Although he is generally considered a Christian thinker, he was nonetheless consistently drawn back to the Greeks for ideas and impulses on any number of topics. He frequently contrasts ancient Greek philosophy, with its emphasis on the lived experience of the individual in daily life, with the abstract German philosophy that was in vogue during his own time. It has been argued that he modeled his work on that of the ancient Greek thinkers specifically in order to contrast his own activity with that of his contemporaries.

While Tome I treats the different sources for Socrates, Tome II features articles dedicated to the rest of Kierkegaard’s Greek sources, beginning with a section containing several articles on different aspects of Aristotle’s writings that influenced his thought. This is followed by another section featuring analyses of other Greek philosophers and philosophical schools, which were important for him. Finally, a third section explores Kierkegaard’s uses of a handful of Greek poets, dramatists and historians.
 

  


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Tänkarens mångfald. Nutida perspektiv på Søren Kierkegaard,
ed. by Lone Koldtoft, Jon Stewart and Jan Holmgaard,
Göteborg and Stockholm: Makadam Förlag 2005
.
327pp.
 

För 150 år sedan dog Søren Kierkegaard, men hans filosofi och författarskap är fortfarande synnerligen levande. I Sverige har hans allmänkulturella betydelse varit stor genom alla år, men hans fackfilosofiska inflytande har varit begränsat, och diskussionerna kring Kierkegaards teologiska roll tystnade kring mitten av förra seklet. Medan det sedan länge finns en mycket aktiv forskningstradition i ämnet i Danmark, har Kierkegaardstudiet i Sverige, med några få undantag, legat i träda. Denna volym vill markera startskottet för en gemensam skandinavisk diskussion om Kierkegaards arbete.
 

I Tänkarens mångfald erbjuds läsaren en hastig orientering i den samtida skandinaviska Kierkegaardforskningen. Bidragen behandlar Kierkegaards förhållande till döden, hans syn på kommunikation, på synd, på den estetiska upplevelsen och på individen. Kierkegaard och Werder, Kierkegaard och Sokrates, och Kierkegaard som profet är andra teman. Utöver uppsatserna återges en text av Kierkegaard själv, närmare bestämt första delen ur hans allra första Journal, AA från 1835–1837.

 

Utdraget innehåller de berömda passagerna från Kierkegaards vistelse i Gilleleje, vilka ofta hyllas som vittnesmål om Kierkegaards religiösa omvändelse eller som inledningen till hans existentiella tänkande. Här återfinns också det stycke där Kierkegaard redogör för sin tur över Öresund, närmare bestämt till Krapperups slott vid foten av Kullaberg, en vistelse som ägde rum den 27–28 juli 1835. Det får stå som symbol för förhoppningarna om fortsatt forskningssamarbete över gränserna, och om en vital vetenskaplig och intellektuell diskussion på svensk markkring Kierkegaards tänkande.
 

 


 

 


 

Kierkegaard und Schelling. Freiheit, Angst und Wirklichkeit
ed. by Jochem Hennigfeld and Jon Stewart
Berlin and New York: Verlag Walter de Gruyter 2003
viii+262pp.
(Kierkegaard Studies. Monograph Series, vol. 8)

 

Die Beiträge dieses Sammelbands behandeln die spannungsreichen Bezüge zwischen Kierkegaards Existenzdenken und Schellings Philosophie des Absoluten. Die Autoren werfen nicht nur ein neues Licht auf das Verhältnis Kierkegaards zur (Spät-) Philosophie Schellings und zum Idealismus überhaupt. Vielmehr eröffnen sie systematische Perspektiven, die—für die Philosophie, die Theologie und die Geisteswissenschaften insgesamt—gerade auch für gegenwärtige Problemstellungen von großer Bedeutung sind.


Reviews

“Insgesamt bietet der Band eine präzise, informative und gut zu lesende Zusammenfassung des gegenwärtigen Forschungsstands zum Verhältnis der beiden höchst unterschiedlichen Denkergestalten Schelling und Kierkegaard.”
Christian Danz, Theologische Literaturzeitung, vol. 129, no. 5, 2004,

columns 554-556.

 



 

 


 

Kierkegaard Revisited: Proceedings from the Conference “Kierkegaard and the Meaning of Meaning It”
ed. by Niels Jørgen Cappelørn and Jon Stewart
Berlin and New York: Verlag Walter de Gruyter 1997
vii+508pp.
(Kierkegaard Studies. Monograph Series, vol. 1)

 

Not since the jubilee conference in 1955, commemorating the hundred year anniversary of Kierkegaard’s death, had Copenhagen been host to a major international Kierkegaard conference. In May of 1996 Kierkegaard scholars from around the world converged on Copenhagen to participate in the conference, “Kierkegaard and the Meaning of Meaning It.” This first volume of the Kierkegaard Studies Monograph Series, edited by The Søren Kierkegaard Research Centre, contains the proceedings of this landmark event in Kierkegaard research.
 

United in their interest in Kierkegaard, the contributors to the collection come from a wide range of different disciples and academic backgrounds. The conference served the function of bringing into dialogue the plethora of different interpretative approaches and methodologies represented in contemporary Kierkegaard research. By so doing, the conference marked a new course for future Kierkegaard research and demonstrated  something of its vast potential.   




2016

“Hegel’s Criticism of Hinduism,” Hegel Bulletin, vol. 37, no. 2, 2016, pp. 281-304.

“Dostoevsky and the Novel as Philosophy,” Working Papers in Philosophy: Registers of Philosophy (Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Research Centre for the Humanities, Institute of Philosophy), vol. 4, 2016, pp. 1-17.
Read the article


2015


“Poul Martin Møller and the Danish Debate about Immortality in the Wake of Hegel’s Philosophy,” Estudios Kierkegaardianos. Revista de filosofía, vol. 1, 2015, pp. 114-146.

“Hegel und Kierkegaard: Die Frage von Glauben und Wissen,” translated by Katalin Nun, [German translation of “Kierkegaard and Hegel on Faith and Knowledge”], in Kierkegaard im Kontext des deutschen Idealismus, ed. by Axel Hutter and Anders Moe Rasmussen, Berlin and Boston: De Gruyter 2014, pp. 121-134. Reprinted in Kierkegaard. Eine Schlüsselfigur der europäischen Moderne, ed. by Markus Pohlmeyer, Hamburg: Igel Verlag 2015 (Flensburger Studien zu Literatur und Theologie, vol. 4), pp. 42-60.)

“Hegel’s Criticism of the Enlightenment and Romanticism: The Problem of Content in Religion,” Filozofia, vol. 70, no. 4, 2015, pp. 272-281.

“An Overview of Kierkegaard’s Nachlass: Part One, The Materials,” Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook, 2015, pp. 327-348.
 
“An Overview of Kierkegaard’s Nachlass: Part Two, The Editions,” Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook, 2015, pp. 349-379.

“Kierkegaard’s View of Hegel, His Followers and Critics” in A Companion to Kierkegaard, ed. by Jon Stewart, Malden, Massachusetts, Oxford, and Chichester: Wiley Blackwell 2015 (Blackwell Companions to Philosophy, vol. 58), pp. 50-65.



2014


“Hegel, Creuzer and the Rise of Orientalism,” The Owl of Minerva, vol. 45, nos. 1-2, 2013-14, pp. 13-34.
 
“Hegel and the Egyptian Religion,” Hegel-Studien, vol. 48, 2014, pp. 125-153.
 
“A polêmica oculta com Adler em O conceito de angústia,” Numen: Revista de Estudos e Pesquisa da Religião, issue 29, vol. 17, no. 2, 2014, pp. 267-298.



2013

“El Espíritu como la clave para la fe religiosa en Kierkegaard y Hegel,” trans. by Gabriel Merlino, Teología y cultura, vol. 15, October 2013, pp. 113-119.

http://www.teologos.com.ar/arch_rev/vol_15/008_STEWART_Espiritu_clave_fe_religiosa_MERLINO.pdf


▪ “Quellenforschung y la relación de Kierkegaard con Hegel: algunas consideraciones metodológicas” [Spanish translation of “Kierkegaard’s Relation to Hegel and Quellenforschung: Some Methodological Considerations”], in Ironía y destino, La Filosofía secreta de Søren Kierkegaard, ed. by Fernando Pérez Borbujo, Barcelona: Herder 2013, pp. 43-76.)

 

▪ “Response to Álvaro L. M. Valls’ ‘Sobre a importância de Lessing no Pós-escrito às Migalhas Filosóficas,’” El arco y la lira, 2013, no. 1, pp. 34-37.

▪ “Coursera, Moocs og Kierkegaard,” TEOL-information, no. 48, September 2013, pp. 35-38.

▪ “Hegel’s Criticism of the Enlightenment’s Charge of the Irrationality of Religion,” in Religion und Irrationalität.
Historisch-systematische Perspektiven, ed. by Joachim Schmidt and Heiko Schulz, Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck 2013, pp. 29-39.

▪ “Kierkegaard’s Relation to Hegel and Quellenforschung: Some Methodological Considerations,”  Filozofia (Institute of Philosophy of the Slovak Academy of Sciences), vol. 68, no. 1, 2013, pp. 17-26. (Spanish translation “Quellenforschung y la relación de Kierkegaard con Hegel: algunas consideraciones metodológicas,” in Ironía y destino, La Filosofía secreta de Søren Kierkegaard, ed. by Fernando Pérez Borbujo, Barcelona: Herder 2013, pp. 43-76.)



2012


“Søren Kierkegaard and the Problem of Pseudonymity,” Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal, vol. 32, no. 2, 2012, pp. 407-434.

“Heiberg’s Conception of Speculative Drama and the Crisis of the Age: Martensen’s Analysis of Fata Morgana” in The Heibergs and the Theater: Between Vaudeville, Romantic Comedy and National Drama, ed. by Jon Stewart, Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press 2012, pp. 139-160. (Danish Golden Age Studies, vol. 7.)

“Et nyt netværk for Kierkegaardforskning i de nordiske lande,” TEOL-information, no. 45, February 2012, pp. 43-46.



2011


“Hegel e Kierkegaard su fede e sapere,” [Italian translation of “Kierkegaard and Hegel on Faith and Knowledge”], in Il discepolo di seconda mano. Saggi su Søren Kierkegaard, ed. by Roberto Garaventa and Diego Giordano, Naples: Orthotes Editrice 2011, pp. 143-168.

“The Notion of Actuality in Kierkegaard and Schelling’s Influence,” Ars brevis anuari de la Càtedra Ramon Llull Blanquerna (Barcelona), vol. 17, 2011, pp. 237-253.


▪ “Kierkegaard’s Enigmatic Reference to Martensen in The Concept of Irony,” in Hans Lassen Martensen: Philosopher and Speculative Theologian, ed. by Jon Stewart, Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press 2012 (Danish Golden Age Studies, vol. 6), pp. 219-238.

 

▪ “Hegel’s Treatment of the Development of Religion after Christianity: Islam,” in Acta Kierkegaardiana, vol. 5, Kierkegaard: East and West, Šala: Kierkegaard Society in Slovakia and Toronto: Kierkegaard Circle, Trinity College 2011, pp. 42-56.

 

▪ “Kierkegaardiańska krytyka abstrakcji i jedno z proponowanych rozwiązań: przyswojenie,” Polish translation of “Kierkegaard’s Criticism of Abstraction and his Proposed Solution: Appropriation,” translated by Aleksandra Amal El-Maaytah and Przemyslaw Bursztyka in Kronos (Warsaw), vol. 17, no. 2, 2011, pp. 180-205.

 

▪ “Hegel’s Historical Methodology in The Concept of Irony,” Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook, 2011, pp. 81-100.

 

▪ “Hegel’s Philosophy of Religion and the Question of ‘Right’ and ‘Left’ Hegelianism,” in Politics, Religion and Art: Hegelian Debates, ed. by Douglas Moggach, Evanston: Northwestern University Press 2011, pp. 66-95.

▪ “Kierkegaard and Hegel on Faith and Knowledge,” in the Blackwell Companion to Hegel, ed. by Stephen Houlgate and Michael Baur, Oxford: Blackwell Publishers 2011, pp. 511-518.



2010


“Kierkegaardov výrok o vzťahu medzi filozofiou a kresťanstvom v Denníku AA,” translated by Tibor Máhrik, [Slovak translation of “Kierkegaard’s Claim about the Relation between Philosophy and Christianity in the Journal AA”], in Kierkegaardovo zrkadlo pre súčasnosť, Acta Kierkegaardiana, Šala: Kierkegaard Society in Slovakia and Toronto: Kierkegaard Circle, Trinity College 2010, Supplement 1, pp. 88-109.)

 

▪ “Hegel, Kierkegaard and the Danish Debate about Mediation,” in Bulletin of the Hegel Society of Great Britain, no. 61, 2010, pp. 61-86.

“The Eleatics: Kierkegaard’s Metaphysical Considerations of Being and Motion,” in Kierkegaard and the Greek World, Tome II, Aristotle and Other Greek Thinkers, ed. by Jon Stewart and Katalin Nun, Aldershot: Ashgate 2010 (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 2), pp. 123-145.


 

2009


• “Johan Ludvig Heiberg: Kierkegaard’s Criticism of Hegel’s Danish Apologist,” in Kierkegaard and his Danish Contemporaries, Tome I, Philosophy, Politics and Social Theory, ed. by Jon Stewart, Aldershot: Ashgate 2009 (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 7), pp. 35-76.


“Kierkegaardove využívanie žánra v zápase s nemeckou filozofiou,” translated by Ivana Komanická [Slovak translation of “Kierkegaard’s Use of Genre in the Struggle with German Philosophy”], Filozofia (Institute of Philosophy of the Slovak Academy of Sciences), vol. 64, no. 8, 2009, pp. 728-738.)

▪ “Rasmus Nielsen: From the Object of ‘Prodigious Concern’ to a ‘Windbag,’ ” in
Kierkegaard and his Danish Contemporaries, Tome I, Philosophy, Politics and Social Theory, ed. by Jon Stewart, Aldershot: Ashgate 2009 (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 7), pp. 179-213.


▪ “Eggert Christopher Tryde: A Mediator of Christianity and a Representative of the Official Christendom,” in Kierkegaard and his Danish Contemporaries, Tome II, Theology, ed. by Jon Stewart, Aldershot: Ashgate 2009 (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 7), pp. 335-354.

▪ “Kierkegaardove využívanie žánra v zápase s nemeckou filozofiou,” translated by Ivana Komanická [Slovak translation of “Kierkegaard’s Use of Genre in the Struggle with German Philosophy”], Filozofia (Institute of Philosophy of the Slovak Academy of Sciences), vol. 64, no. 8, 2009, pp. 728-738.

▪ “Hegel’s Teleology of World Religions and the Disanalogy of the Lectures on the Philosophy of Religion,” in Acta Kierkegaardiana, vol. 4, Kierkegaard and the Nineteenth Century Religious Crisis in Europe, Šala: Kierkegaard Society in Slovakia and Toronto: Kierkegaard Circle, Trinity College 2009, pp. 17-31.

▪ “Kierkegaard’s Use of Genre in the Struggle with German Philosophy,” in …und Literatur. Pierre Bühler zum 60. Geburtstag, ed. by the Institut für Hermeneutik und Religionsphilosophie, Theologische Fakultät, Universität Zürich (Hermeneutische Blätter, nos. 1-2, 2009), pp. 162-186.

▪ “France: Kierkegaard as a Forerunner of Existentialism and Poststructuralism,” in Kierkegaard’s International Reception, Tome I: Northern and Western Europe, ed. by Jon Stewart, Aldershot: Ashgate 2009 (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 8), pp. 421-474.

▪ “Nepos: Traces of Kierkegaard’s Use of an Edifying Roman Biographer,” in Kierkegaard and the Roman World, ed. by Jon Stewart, Aldershot: Ashgate 2009 (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 3), pp. 75-85.

▪ “Tacitus: Christianity as odium generis humani,” in Kierkegaard and the Roman World, ed. by Jon Stewart, Aldershot: Ashgate 2009 (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 3), pp. 147-161.



2008


“Kierkegaard i Hegel o wierze i wiedzy,” translated by Antoni Szwed, [Polish translation of “Kierkegaard and Hegel on Faith and Knowledge”], Logos i Ethos (Cracow, Poland), no. 2, vol. 25, 2008, pp. 27-45.

▪ “Heiberg’s Speculative Poetry as a Model for Kierkegaard’s Concept of Controlled Irony,” in
Johan Ludvig Heiberg: Philosopher, Littérateur, Dramaturge, and Political Thinker, edited by Jon Stewart. Copenhagen: C.A. Reitzel 2008 (Danish Golden Age Studies, vol. 5), pp. 195-216.


▪ “Solger: An Apostle of Irony Sacrificed to Hegel’s System,” in Kierkegaard and his German Contemporaries, Tome III, Literature and Aesthetics, edited by Jon Stewart. Aldershot: Ashgate 2008 (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 6), pp. 235-269.

▪ “Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources. A New Tool in Kierkegaard Studies,” Intellectual History Review, June 2008, pp. 278-280.

▪ “Hegel’s Phenomenology as a Systematic Fragment,” The Cambridge Companion to Hegel and Nineteenth-Century Philosophy, ed. by Frederick C. Beiser, Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press 2008, pp. 74-93.

▪ “Kierkegaard’s Claim about the Relation between Philosophy and Christianity in the Journal AA,” in Acta Kierkegaardiana, vol. 3: Kierkegaard and Christianity, Šala: Kierkegaard Society in Slovakia and Toronto: Kierkegaard Circle, Trinity College 2008, pp. 35-58

▪ “The Finite and the Infinite: Johan Ludvig Heiberg’s Enigmatic Relation to Hegelianism,” Filosofiske Studier, ed. by Finn Collin and Jan Riis Flor (special issue, Festskrift tilegnet Carl Henrik Koch), 2008, pp. 267-280.



2007


▪ “The Dating of Kierkegaard’s The Conflict between the Old and the New Soap-Cellars: A New Proposal,” Kierkegaardiana, vol. 24, 2007, pp. 220-244.

▪ “Kierkegaard’s Recurring Criticism of Hegel’s ‘The Good and Conscience,’ ” Bulletin of the Hegel Society of Great Britain, nos. 55-56, 2007, pp. 45-66.

▪ “Hegel: Kierkegaard’s Reading and Use of Hegel’s Primary Texts,” in Kierkegaard and his German Contemporaries, Tome I: Philosophy, edited by Jon Stewart. Aldershot: Ashgate 2007 (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 6), pp. 97-165.

▪ “Werder: The Influence of Werder’s Lectures and Logik on Kierkegaard’s Thought,” in Kierkegaard and his German Contemporaries, Tome I: Philosophy, edited by Jon Stewart. Aldershot: Ashgate 2007 (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 6), pp. 335-371.

▪ “Daub: Kierkegaard’s Paradoxical Use of a Hegelian Sentry,” in Kierkegaard and his German Contemporaries, Tome II: Theology, edited by Jon Stewart. Aldershot: Ashgate 2007 (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 6), pp. 53-78.



2006


凯郭尔对黑格尔体系中伦理学缺失的批判, translated by Wang Qi [Chinese translation of “Kierkegaard’s Criticism of the Absence of Ethics in Hegel’s System”] in 世界哲学 [World Philosophy] (Beijing: Chinese Academy of Social Sciences), no. 3, 2006, pp. 22-32.

 

▪ “Johan Ludvig Heiberg and the Beginnings of the Hegel Reception in Denmark,” Hegel-Studien, vols. 39-40, 2005, pp. 141-181.


2005


▪ “Poul Martin Møller. Et nyt Fund,” Fund og Forskning, vol. 44, 2005, pp. 415-424.

▪ “Kierkegaard’s Criticism of the Absence of Ethics in Hegel’s System,” ARCHE Journal of Philosophy (Novi Sad), no. 3, 2005, pp. 47-60.

▪ “The Influence of Werder’s Lectures and Logik on Kierkegaard’s Thought,” in Tänkarens mångfald. Nutida perspektiv på Søren Kierkegaard, ed. by Lone Koldtoft, Jon Stewart and Jan Holmgaard. Göteborg and Stockholm: Makadam Förlag 2005, pp. 244-290.


2004


▪ “Schleiermacher’s Visit to Copenhagen in 1833,” Zeitschrift für Neuere Theologiegeschichte, vol. 11, issue 2, 2004, pp. 279-302.

▪ “The Paradox and the Criticism of Hegelian Mediation in Philosophical Fragments,” Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook, 2004, pp. 186-209.


2003


▪ “Hegel, Kierkegaard és a közvetítés a Filozófiai morzsák-ban,” translated by Áron Telegdi, [Hungarian translation of “Hegel, Kierkegaard, and Mediation in the Philosophical Fragments”], Magyar Filozófiai Szemle, nos. 1-2, 2003, pp. 217-231.

▪ “The Reception of Kierkegaard’s Nachlaß in the English-Speaking World,” Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook, 2003, pp. 277-315.

▪ “Kierkegaard and Hegelianism in Golden Age Denmark,” in Kierkegaard and his Contemporaries: The Culture of Golden Age Denmark, ed. by Jon Stewart. Berlin and New York: Verlag Walter de Gruyter, 2003. pp. 106-145. (Kierkegaard Studies. Monograph Series, vol. 10.)


2001


▪ “Kierkegaard’s Criticism of Martensen in the Concluding Unscientific Postscript,” Revue Roumaine de Philosophie, tome 45, nos. 1-2, 2001, pp. 133-148.

▪ “Johan Ludvig Heiberg (1791-1860),” Scandinavian Review, vol. 88, no. 3, Winter 2001, pp. 71-72.

▪ “Kierkegaards forhold til Hegel—et filosofi-historisk topos,” translated by Thor Arvid Dyrerud, [Norwegian translation of “Kierkegaard’s Relation to Hegel—a Topos in the History of Philosophy”], AAR. Idéhistorisk Tidsskrift, 1-2, 2001, pp. 84-91.

▪ “Hegel and Adler in the Introduction to The Concept of Anxiety,” Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook, 2001, pp. 43-77.



1999


▪ “Hegel’s Presence in The Concept of Irony,” Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook, 1999, pp. 245-277. (Reprinted in Søren Kierkegaard: Critical Assessments of Leading Philosophers, vols. 1-4, ed. by Daniel W. Conway. London: Routledge 2002, vol. 1: Authorship and Authenticity, pp. 221-249.)

▪ “Kierkegaard and Hegel on Faith and Politics,” Kierkegaardiana, vol. 20, 1999, pp. 251-254.

▪ “Idealism in Two Stories from The Book of Sand,” Variaciones Borges, vol. 7, 1999, pp. 50-65.

▪ “Perzeusz Heiberga a Z papierów jeszcze zyjacego Kierkegaarda,” translated by Bronislaw Swiderski, [Polish translation of “Heiberg’s Perseus and Kierkegaard’s From the Papers of One Still Living,”] in Tozsamosci Kierkegaarda, in Principia, Tome XXIII, 1999, pp. 25-42.




1998


“Kierkegaard as Hegelian,” Enrahonar. Quaderns de Filosofía, no. 29, 1998, pp. 147-152.

▪ “Hegel als Quelle für Kierkegaards Wiederholungsbegriff,”
Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook, 1998, pp. 302-317.


▪ “Hegel’s Influence on Kierkegaard’s Interpretation of Antigone,” Persona y Derecho, no. 39, 1998, pp. 195-216.

▪ “Hegel’s View of Moral Conscience and Kierkegaard’s Interpretation of Abraham,” Kierkegaardiana, vol. 19, 1998, pp. 58-80.



1997


▪ “Hegel und die Ironiethese zu Kierkegaards Über den Begriff der Ironie,” Jahrbuch für Hegelforschung, vol. 3, 1997, pp. 157-181.

▪ “Kierkegaard’s Phenomenology of Despair in The Sickness unto Death,” Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook, 1997, pp. 117-143.

▪ “Existentialism,” in the Encyclopedia of Applied Ethics, ed. by Ruth Chadwick, San Diego: Academic Press, Inc. 1997, pp. 203-218.

▪ “Challenging Prescriptions for Discourse: Seneca’s Use of Paradox and Oxymoron,” Mosaic, vol. 30, no. 1, 1997, pp. 1-17.



1996


▪ “Borges and the Refutation of Idealism: A Study of ‘Tlön, Uqbar, Orbis Tertis,’ ” Ideas y Valores, no. 101, 1996, pp. 64-99. (Spanish translation, “Borges y la Refutación del Idealismo: Un Estudio de ‘Tlön, Uqbar, Orbis Tertius,’ ” ibid.)

▪ “Hegel and Nietzsche on the Death of Tragedy and Greek Ethical Life,” Nietzscheforschung. Ein Jahrbuch, vol. 3, 1996, pp. 293-316.

▪ “Borges’ Refutation of Nominalism in ‘Funes el memorioso,’ ” Variaciones Borges, vol. 1, no. 2, 1996, pp. 68-85.

▪ “Hegel’s Doctrine of Determinate Negation: An Example from ‘Sense-Certainty’ and ‘Perception,’ ” Idealistic Studies, vol. 26, no. 1, 1996, pp. 57-78.

▪ “Die Beziehung zwischen der Jenaer Metaphysik von 1804-5 und der Phänomenologie des Geistes,” Jahrbuch für Hegelforschung, vol. 2, 1996, pp. 99-132.



1995


▪ “Borges on Language and Translation,” Philosophy and Literature, vol. 19, no. 2, 1995, pp. 320-329.

▪ “The Architectonic of Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit,” Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, vol. 55, no. 4, 1995, pp. 747-776. (Reprinted in The Phenomenology of Spirit Reader: A Collection of Critical Essays, ed. by Jon Stewart. Albany, New York: SUNY Press 1998, pp. 444-477.)

▪ “Merleau-Ponty’s Criticisms of Sartre’s Theory of Freedom,” Philosophy Today, vol. 39, no. 3, 1995, pp. 311-324. (Reprinted in The Debate Between Sartre and Merleau-Ponty, ed. by Jon Stewart. Evanston, Illinois: Northwestern University Press 1998, pp. 197-214.)

▪ “Schopenhauer’s Charge and Modern Academic Philosophy: Some Problems Facing Philosophical Pedagogy,” Metaphilosophy, vol. 26, no. 3, 1995, pp. 270-278.

▪ “Hegel and the Myth of Reason,” The Owl of Minerva, vol. 26, no. 2, 1995, pp. 187-200. (Reprinted in The Hegel Myths and Legends, ed. by Jon Stewart.
Evanston, Illinois: Northwestern University Press 1996, pp. 306-318.)



1994


▪ “Einige Probleme im Philosophiestudium in Deutschland: Plädoyer für einen festen Lehrplan,” Zeitschrift für Didaktik der Philosophie und Ethik, vol. 16, no. 3, 1994, pp. 210-214.

▪ “The Philosophical Curriculum and Literary Culture: A Response to Rorty,” Man and World, vol. 27, no. 2, 1994, pp. 195-209.

▪ “Satire as Philosophy: Erasmus’ Moriae Encomium,” International Studies in Philosophy, vol. 26, no. 2, 1994, pp. 73-90.



1993

▪ “Borges on Immortality,” Philosophy and Literature, vol. 17, no. 2, 1993, pp. 78-82.

▪ “Berührungspunkte in der Religionsphilosophie Hegels und Schopenhauers,” Prima Philosophia, vol. 6, no. 1, 1993, pp. 3-8.



1991

▪ “Die Rolle des unglücklichen Bewußtseins in Hegels Phänomenologie des Geistes,” Deutsche Zeitschrift für Philosophie, vol. 39, no. 1, 1991, pp. 12-21.

 



“Niels Jørgen Cappelørn, Joakim Garff, Johnny Kondrup, Skriftbilleder. Søren Kierkegaards journaler, notesbøger, hæfter, ark, lapper og strimler, Copenhagen: G.E.C. Gad 1996, 176pp.,” in Kierkegaard Secondary Literature, Tome I, Catalan, Chinese, Czech, Danish and Dutch, ed. by Jon Stewart, Aldershot: Ashgate 2016, pp. 59-63. (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 18).

 

“Henning Fenger, Kierkegaard-Myter og Kierkegaard-Kilder. Odense: Odense Universitetsforlag 1976 (Odense University Studies in Scandinavian Languages and Literatures, vol. 7), 286pp.,” in Kierkegaard Secondary Literature, Tome I, Catalan, Chinese, Czech, Danish and Dutch, ed. by Jon Stewart, Aldershot: Ashgate 2016, pp. 65-70. (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 18).

 

“Carl Henrik Koch, En flue på Hegels udødelige næse eller Om Adolph Peter Adler og om Søren Kierkegaards forhold til ham, Copenhagen: C.A. Reitzel 1990, 240 pp.,” in Kierkegaard Secondary Literature, Tome I, Catalan, Chinese, Czech, Danish and Dutch, ed. by Jon Stewart, Aldershot: Ashgate 2016, pp. 103-107. (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 18).

 

“Sejer Kühle, Søren Kierkegaards Barndom og ungdom, Copenhagen: Aschehoug 1950, 211pp.” in Kierkegaard Secondary Literature, Tome I, Catalan, Chinese, Czech, Danish and Dutch, ed. by Jon Stewart, Aldershot: Ashgate 2016, pp. 109-112. (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 18).

 

“Gregor Malantschuk, Dialektik og Eksistens hos Søren Kierkegaard, Hans Reitzels Forlag 1968, 356pp.,” in Kierkegaard Secondary Literature, Tome I, Catalan, Chinese, Czech, Danish and Dutch, ed. by Jon Stewart, Aldershot: Ashgate 2016, pp. 119-124. (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 18).


“Svend Aage Nielsen, Kierkegaard og Regensen. Kierkegaards forhold til F.C. Petersen, Poul Martin Møller, D.G. Monrad, Magnus Eiriksson, Carl Ploug, P.L. Møller, Hans Brøchner og J.C. Hostrup, Copenhagen: Graabroødre Torv’s Forlag 1965, 154 pp.” in Kierkegaard Secondary Literature, Tome I, Catalan, Chinese, Czech, Danish and Dutch, ed. by Jon Stewart, Aldershot: Ashgate 2016, pp. 131-135. (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 18).

 

“Paul V. Rubow, Kierkegaard og hans Samtidige, Copenhagen: Gyldendalske Boghandel, Nordisk Forlag 1950, 67pp.” in Kierkegaard Secondary Literature, Tome I, Catalan, Chinese, Czech, Danish and Dutch, ed. by Jon Stewart, Aldershot: Ashgate 2016, pp. 157-160. (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 18).

 

“Niels Thulstrup, Kierkegaards forhold til Hegel og til den spekulative idealisme indtil 1846, Copenhagen: Gyldendal 1967, 354pp.),” in Kierkegaard Secondary Literature, Tome I, Catalan, Chinese, Czech, Danish and Dutch, ed. by Jon Stewart, Aldershot: Ashgate 2016, pp. 185-189. (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 18).

 

“John Lippitt and George Pattison (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Kierkegaard, Oxford: Oxford University Press 2013. xx + 581pp.,” in Kierkegaard Secondary Literature, Tome III: English, L-Z, ed. by Jon Stewart, London and New York: Routledge 2016 (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 18), pp. 25-29.

 

“Katalin Nun, Women of the Danish Golden Age: Literature, Theater and the Emancipation of Women, Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press 2013 (Danish Golden Age Studies, vol. 8), xvi + 180pp” in Kierkegaard Secondary Literature, Tome III: English, L-Z, ed. by Jon Stewart, London and New York: Routledge 2016 (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 18), pp. 115-118.


“Gregory L. Reece, Irony and Religious Belief, Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck 2002 (Religion in Philosophy and Theology, vol. 5). 177pp.,” in Kierkegaard Secondary Literature, Tome III: English, L-Z, ed. by Jon Stewart, London and New York: Routledge 2016 (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 18), pp. 171-174.

 

“Curtis L. Thompson, Following the Cultured Public’s Chosen One: Why Martensen Mattered to Kierkegaard, Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press 2008 (Danish Golden Age Studies, vol. 4), xvi + 216pp.” in Kierkegaard Secondary Literature, Tome III: English, L-Z, ed. by Jon Stewart, London and New York: Routledge 2016 (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 18), pp. 257-260.


“Frederick C. Beiser, Late German Idealism: Trendelenburg and Lotze, Oxford: Oxford University Press 2013. xi, 333 pp.,” Hegel-Studien, Band 48, 2015, pp. 209-211.

 

Hegel’s Philosophy of the Historical Religions, ed. by Bart Labuschagne and Timo Slootweg, Leiden and Boston: Brill 2012,” Hegel-Studien, Band 49, 2015, pp. 241-243.


▪ “Frederick C. Beiser, Late German Idealism: Trendelenburg and Lotze, Oxford: Oxford University Press 2013. xi, 333 pp.,” Hegel-Studien, Band 48, 2015, pp. 209-211.
 
▪ “Hegel’s Philosophy of the Historical Religions, ed. by Bart Labuschagne and Timo Slootweg, Leiden and Boston: Brill 2012,” Hegel-Studien, Band 49, 2015, pp. 71-73.

 

▪ “Mark C. Taylor, Journeys to Selfhood: Hegel and Kierkegaard, New York: Fordham University Press 2000, Volume 14 in Perspectives in Continental Philosophy, edited by John D. Caputo (First edition: Berkeley: University of California Press 1980),” Kierkegaardiana, vol. 22, 2002, pp. 247-251.


“Jørgen Huggler, Hegels skeptiske vej til den absolutte viden. En analyse af Phänomenologie des Geistes. Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanums Forlag 1999. 363pp.,” Hegel-Studien, Band 36, 2001, pp. 310-314.




Translations: Articles

Primary Texts

 

2016

Andreas Frederik Beck, “Andreas Frederik Beck’s Review of Philosophical Fragments,” Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook, 2016, pp. 307-314. (German-English)


2011

Johan Ludvig Heiberg, “Negotiations with the Editorial Board of the Maanedsskrift for Litteratur,” in Heiberg’s Perseus and Other Texts, ed. and trans. by Jon Stewart, Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press 2011 (Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 6), pp. 57-68 (Danish-English)

Johan Ludvig Heiberg, Perseus, in Heiberg’s Perseus and Other Texts, ed. and trans. by Jon Stewart, Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press 2011 (Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 6), pp. 69-149 (Danish-English)

Pseudonymous, “Review of Perseus, Journal for the Speculative Idea,” in Heiberg’s Perseus and Other Texts, ed. and trans. by Jon Stewart, Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press 2011 (Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 6), pp. 151-155 (Danish-English)

Søren Kierkegaard, “Preface VIII,” in Heiberg’s Perseus and Other Texts, ed. and trans. by Jon Stewart, Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press 2011 (Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 6), pp. 157-180 (Danish-English)


2009

Frederik Christian Sibbern, “On the Manner in Which the Law of Contradiction is Treated in the Hegelian School,” in Mynster’s “Rationalism, Supernaturalism” and the Debate about Mediation, ed. and trans. by Jon Stewart, Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press 2009 (Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 5), pp. 47-56. (Danish-English)

Johan Alfred Bornemann, “Review of Martensen’s De autonomia conscientiae,” in Mynster’s “Rationalism, Supernaturalism” and the Debate about Mediation, ed. and trans. by Jon Stewart, Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press 2009 (Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 5), pp. 57-91. (Danish-English)

Jakob Peter Mynster, “Rationalism, Supernaturalism,” in Mynster’s “Rationalism, Supernaturalism” and the Debate about Mediation, ed. and trans. by Jon Stewart, Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press 2009 (Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 5), pp. 93-110. (Danish-English)

Johan Ludvig Heiberg, “A Remark on Logic in Reference to the Right Reverend Bishop Mynster’s treatise on Rationalism and Supernaturalism,” in Mynster’s “Rationalism, Supernaturalism” and the Debate about Mediation, ed. and trans. by Jon Stewart, Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press 2009 (Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 5), pp. 111-125. (Danish-English)

Hans Lassen Martensen, “Rationalism, Supernaturalism and the principium exclusi medii,” in Mynster’s “Rationalism, Supernaturalism” and the Debate about Mediation, ed. and trans. by Jon Stewart, Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press 2009 (Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 5), pp. 127-143. (Danish-English)

Andreas Ferdinand Schiødte, “A Few Words for More Careful Consideration Concerning the Three so-called Laws of Logic,” in Mynster’s “Rationalism, Supernaturalism” and the Debate about Mediation, ed. and trans. by Jon Stewart, Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press 2009 (Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 5), pp. 145-154. (Danish-English)

Jakob Peter Mynster, “On the Laws of Logic,” in Mynster’s “Rationalism, Supernaturalism” and the Debate about Mediation, ed. and trans. by Jon Stewart, Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press 2009 (Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 5), pp. 155-180. (Danish-English)

Søren Kierkegaard, “Either/Or. An Ecstatic Discourse,” in Mynster’s “Rationalism, Supernaturalism” and the Debate about Mediation, ed. and trans. by Jon Stewart, Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press 2009 (Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 5), pp. 181-185. (Danish-English)

Søren Kierkegaard, “The Pet Theory of the Recent Philosophy,” in Mynster’s “Rationalism, Supernaturalism” and the Debate about Mediation, ed. and trans. by Jon Stewart, Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press 2009 (Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 5), pp. 187-195. (Danish-English)

Søren Kierkegaard, “Preface VII,” in Mynster’s “Rationalism, Supernaturalism” and the Debate about Mediation, ed. and trans. by Jon Stewart, Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press 2009 (Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 5), pp. 197-209. (Danish-English)

Rasmus Nielsen, “The Logical Form of Judgment,” in Mynster’s “Rationalism, Supernaturalism” and the Debate about Mediation, ed. and trans. by Jon Stewart, Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press 2009 (Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 5), pp. 211-221. (Danish-English)

Søren Kierkegaard, “A Favorite Game of the Hegelians,” in Mynster’s “Rationalism, Supernaturalism” and the Debate about Mediation, ed. and trans. by Jon Stewart, Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press 2009 (Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 5), pp. 223-238. (Danish-English)

Johann Friedrich Herbart, Treatise on not Neglecting the Law of Excluded Middle between Contradictories in Logic, in Mynster’s “Rationalism, Supernaturalism” and the Debate about Mediation, ed. and trans. by Jon Stewart, Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press 2009 (Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 5), pp. 241-263. (Latin-English)

I.H. Fichte, Treatise on the Value and Order of the Laws of Contradiction, Identity and Excluded Middle in Logic, in Mynster’s “Rationalism, Supernaturalism” and the Debate about Mediation, ed. and trans. by Jon Stewart, Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press 2009 (Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 5), pp. 265-287. (Latin-English)


2008

Johan Ludvig Heiberg, Contingency Regarded from the Point of View of Logic in Heiberg’s Contingency Regarded from the Point of View of Logic and Other Texts, ed. and trans. by Jon Stewart, Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press 2008 (Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 4), pp. 51-75. (German-English)

Frederik Christian Sibbern, “Review of Contingency Regarded from the Point of View of Logic,” in Heiberg’s Contingency Regarded from the Point of View of Logic and Other Texts, ed. and trans. by Jon Stewart, Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press 2008 (Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 4), pp. 77-87. (Danish-English)

Johan Ludvig Heiberg, “On Solger,” in Heiberg’s Contingency Regarded from the Point of View of Logic and Other Texts, ed. and trans. by Jon Stewart, Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press 2008 (Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 4), pp. 89-93. (Danish-English)

Johan Ludvig Heiberg, “A Letter Found in the Street,” in Heiberg’s Contingency Regarded from the Point of View of Logic and Other Texts, ed. and trans. by Jon Stewart, Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press 2008 (Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 4), pp. 95-100. (Danish-English)

Johan Ludvig Heiberg, “Nemesis: A Popular Philosophical Investigation,” in Heiberg’s Contingency Regarded from the Point of View of Logic and Other Texts, ed. and trans. by Jon Stewart, Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press 2008 (Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 4), pp. 101-125. (Danish-English)

Johan Ludvig Heiberg, “On the Materialist and Idealist Principle in Language,” in Heiberg’s Contingency Regarded from the Point of View of Logic and Other Texts, ed. and trans. by Jon Stewart, Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press 2008 (Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 4), pp. 127-145. (Danish-English)

▪ Johan Ludvig Heiberg, “On Beauty in Nature,” in Heiberg’s Contingency Regarded from the Point of View of Logic and Other Texts, ed. and trans. by Jon Stewart, Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press 2008 (Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 4), pp. 147-159. (Danish-English)

Johan Ludvig Heiberg, “A Few Words about the Infinite,” in Heiberg’s Contingency Regarded from the Point of View of Logic and Other Texts, ed. and trans. by Jon Stewart, Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press 2008 (Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 4), pp. 161-166. (Danish-English)

Johan Ludvig Heiberg, “Symbolism,” in Heiberg’s Contingency Regarded from the Point of View of Logic and Other Texts, ed. and trans. by Jon Stewart, Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press 2008 (Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 4), pp. 167-198. (Danish-English)

Johan Ludvig Heiberg, “Letters to a Village Pastor,” in Heiberg’s Contingency Regarded from the Point of View of Logic and Other Texts, ed. and trans. by Jon Stewart, Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press 2008 (Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 4), pp. 199-222. (Danish-English)


2007

Johan Ludvig Heiberg, Introductory Lecture to the Logic Course in Heiberg’s Introductory Lecture to the Logic Course and Other Texts, ed. and trans. by Jon Stewart, Copenhagen: C.A. Reitzel 2007 (Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 3), pp. 39-72. (Danish-English)

Hans Lassen Martensen, “Review of the Introductory Lecture to the Logic Course,” in Heiberg’s Introductory Lecture to the Logic Course and Other Texts, ed. and trans. by Jon Stewart, Copenhagen: C.A. Reitzel 2007 (Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 3), pp. 73-86. (Danish-English)

Johan Ludvig Heiberg, “Philosophy and System,” in Heiberg’s Introductory Lecture to the Logic Course and Other Texts, ed. and trans. by Jon Stewart, Copenhagen: C.A. Reitzel 2007 (Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 3), pp. 87-96. (Danish-English) 

Frederik Christian Sibbern, “Philosophy in Relation to Faith,” in Heiberg’s Introductory Lecture to the Logic Course and Other Texts, ed. and trans. by Jon Stewart, Copenhagen: C.A. Reitzel 2007 (Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 3), pp. 97-114. (Danish-English)

Rasmus Nielsen, “Return to the Church: Speculative Theology,” in Heiberg’s Introductory Lecture to the Logic Course and Other Texts, ed. and trans. by Jon Stewart, Copenhagen: C.A. Reitzel 2007 (Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 3), pp. 115-121. (Danish-English)

Søren Kierkegaard, “Subjective Truth, Inwardness; The Truth is Subjectivity,” in Heiberg’s Introductory Lecture to the Logic Course and Other Texts, ed. and trans. by Jon Stewart, Copenhagen: C.A. Reitzel 2007 (Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 3), pp. 123-141. (Danish-English)


2006

Johan Ludvig Heiberg, Outline of the Philosophy of Philosophy or Speculative Logic in Heiberg’s Speculative Logic and Other Texts, ed. and trans. by Jon Stewart, Copenhagen: C.A. Reitzel 2006 (Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 2), pp. 37-213. (Danish-English)

Andreas Peter Liunge, “Literary Notice. The Newest of the New in Our Literature,” in Heiberg’s Speculative Logic and Other Texts, ed. and trans. by Jon Stewart, Copenhagen: C.A. Reitzel 2006 (Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 2), pp. 215-218. (Danish-English)

Andreas Peter Liunge, “Letter from Ole Peersen to the Editor of Københavns-Posten,” in Heiberg’s Speculative Logic and Other Texts, ed. and trans. by Jon Stewart, Copenhagen: C.A. Reitzel 2006 (Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 2), pp. 219-224. (Danish-English)


2005

Johan Ludvig Heiberg, “A Letter to Hegel,” in Heiberg’s On the Significance of Philosophy for the Present Age and Other Texts, ed. and trans. by Jon Stewart, Copenhagen: C.A. Reitzel 2005 (Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 1), pp. 69-72. (German-English)

Johan Ludvig Heiberg, “Autobiographical Fragments,” in Heiberg’s On the Significance of Philosophy for the Present Age and Other Texts, ed. and trans. by Jon Stewart, Copenhagen: C.A. Reitzel 2005 (Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 1), pp. 55-68. (Danish-English)

Johan Ludvig Heiberg, “A Letter to H.C. Ørsted,” in Heiberg’s On the Significance of Philosophy for the Present Age and Other Texts, ed. and trans. by Jon Stewart, Copenhagen: C.A. Reitzel 2005 (Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 1), pp. 73-79. (Danish-English)

Johan Ludvig Heiberg, On the Significance of Philosophy for the Present Age, in Heiberg’s On the Significance of Philosophy for the Present Age and Other Texts, ed. and trans. by Jon Stewart, Copenhagen: C.A. Reitzel 2005 (Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 1), pp. 83-119. (Danish-English)

Frederik Ludvig Bang Zeuthen, “Elucidations of Prof. J.L. Heiberg’s Treatise On the Significance of Philosophy for the Present Age,” in Heiberg’s On the Significance of Philosophy for the Present Age and Other Texts, ed. and trans. by Jon Stewart, Copenhagen: C.A. Reitzel 2005 (Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 1), pp. 121-130. (Danish-English)

Johan Ludvig Heiberg, “On Occasion of Magister Zeuthen’s so-called Elucidations,” in Heiberg’s On the Significance of Philosophy for the Present Age and Other Texts, ed. and trans. by Jon Stewart, Copenhagen: C.A. Reitzel 2005 (Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 1), pp. 131-138. (Danish-English)

Jakob Peter Mynster, “On Religious Conviction,” in Heiberg’s On the Significance of Philosophy for the Present Age and Other Texts, ed. and trans. by Jon Stewart, Copenhagen: C.A. Reitzel 2005 (Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 1), pp. 139-159. (Danish-English)

Anonymous, “A Serious Word Concerning Prof. Heiberg’s Work, On the Significance of Philosophy for the Present Age,” in Heiberg’s On the Significance of Philosophy for the Present Age and Other Texts, ed. and trans. by Jon Stewart, Copenhagen: C.A. Reitzel 2005 (Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 1), pp. 161-165. (Danish-English)

Eggert Christopher Tryde, “Review of On the Significance of Philosophy for the Present Age,” in Heiberg’s On the Significance of Philosophy for the Present Age and Other Texts, ed. and trans. by Jon Stewart, Copenhagen: C.A. Reitzel 2005 (Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 1), pp. 167-190. (Danish-English)

Johan Ludvig Heiberg, “On Occasion of the Review of My Work, On the Significance of Philosophy for the Present Age,” in Heiberg’s On the Significance of Philosophy for the Present Age and Other Texts, ed. and trans. by Jon Stewart, Copenhagen: C.A. Reitzel 2005 (Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 1), pp. 191-203. (Danish-English)

Eggert Christopher Tryde, “Reply from the Reviewer of Professor Heiberg’s Treatise, On the Significance of Philosophy for the Present Age,” in Heiberg’s On the Significance of Philosophy for the Present Age and Other Texts, ed. and trans. by Jon Stewart, Copenhagen: C.A. Reitzel 2005 (Texts from Golden Age Denmark, vol. 1), pp. 205-213. (Danish-English)


2004

▪ Hans Lassen Martensen, “Rationalism, Supernaturalism and the principium exclusi medii,” Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook, 2004, pp. 585-600. (Danish-English)

▪ Jakob Peter Mynster, “Rationalism, Supernaturalism,” Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook, 2004, pp. 567-584. (Danish-English)

▪ Johan Ludvig Heiberg, “On the Significance of Philosophy for the Present Age,” (translated in part) Scandinavian Review, vol. 88, no. 3, Winter 2001, pp. 76-78. (Danish-English)

▪ Johan Ludvig Heiberg, “Autobiographical Fragments,” Scandinavian Review, vol. 88, no. 3, Winter 2001, pp. 73-75. (Danish-English)

▪ Jean-Paul Sartre and Maurice Merleau-Ponty, “Philosophy and Political Engagement: Letters from the Quarrel Between Sartre and Merleau-Ponty,” in The Debate Between Sartre and Merleau-Ponty, edited by Jon Stewart.
Evanston, Illinois: Northwestern University Press, 1998, pp. 327-354. (French-English)


 

 

Secondary Literature

 

2015

Carl Henrik Koch, “Kierkegaard’s Relations to Danish Philosophy of the Golden Age,” in A Companion to Kierkegaard, ed. by Jon Stewart, Malden, Massachusetts, Oxford, and Chichester: Wiley Blackwell 2015 (Blackwell Companions to Philosophy, vol. 58), pp. 66-79. (Danish-English)


2013


▪ Peter Tudvad, “Henrik Pontoppidan: Inspiration and Hesitation,” in Kierkegaard’s Influence on Literature and Criticism, Tome II, Denmark, Aldershot: Ashgate 2013 (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 12), pp. 137-165. (Danish-English)

▪ Steen Tullberg, “Rudolf Kassner: A Physiognomical Appropriation,” in Kierkegaard’s Influence on Literature and Criticism, Tome I, The Germanophone World, ed. by Jon Stewart, Aldershot: Ashgate 2013 (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 12), pp. 141-156. (Danish-English)

▪ Markus Kleinert, “Theodor Haecker: The Mobilization of a Total Writer,” in Kierkegaard’s Influence on Literature and Criticism, Tome I, The Germanophone World, ed. by Jon Stewart, Aldershot: Ashgate 2013 (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 12), pp. 91-114. (German-English)



2012


▪ Carl Henrik Koch, “Aesthetics and Christianity in the Early Works of H.L. Martensen,” in Hans Lassen Martensen: Speculative Theologian and Philosopher, ed. by Jon Stewart, Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press 2012 (Danish Golden Age Studies, vol. 6), pp. 195-218. (Danish-English)


2011


▪ Carl Henrik Koch, “Hans Brøchner: Professor of Philosophy, Antagonist—and a Loving and Admiring Relative” in Kierkegaard’s Influence on Philosophy, Tome I, German and Scandinavian Philosophy, ed. by Jon Stewart, Aldershot: Ashgate 2011 (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 11), pp. 245-265. (Danish-English)

▪ Carl Henrik Koch, “Harald Høffding: The Respectful Critic,” in Kierkegaard’s Influence on Philosophy, Tome I, German and Scandinavian Philosophy, ed. by Jon Stewart, Aldershot: Ashgate 2011 (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 11), pp. 267-288. (Danish-English)

 

▪ Leif Bork Hansen, “Giorgio Agamben: State of Exception” in Kierkegaard’s Influence on Social-Political Thought, Aldershot: Ashgate 2011 (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 14), pp. 1-28. (Danish-English)

 


2010


▪ Niels W. Bruun and Finn Gredal Jensen, “Kierkegaard’s Latin Translations of the New Testament: A Constant Dialogue with the Vulgate,” in Kierkegaard and the Bible, Tome II, The New Testament, ed. by Lee C. Barrett and Jon Stewart, Aldershot: Ashgate 2010 (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 1), pp. 221-236. (Danish-English)


▪ Tonny Aagaard Olesen, “Kierkegaard’s Socrates Sources: Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Danish Scholarship,” in Kierkegaard and the Greek World, Tome I, Socrates and Plato, ed. by Jon Stewart and Katalin Nun, Aldershot: Ashgate 2010 (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 2), pp. 215-267. (Danish-English)



2009


▪ Ivan Ž. Sørensen, “Savonarola: Kierkegaard’s Model for the Blood-Witness,” in Kierkegaard and the Renaissance and Modern Traditions, Tome II, Theology, ed. by Jon Stewart, Aldershot: Ashgate 2009 (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 5), pp. 219-243. (Danish-English)

▪ Kim Ravn, “Ewald: Poetic Fire,” in Kierkegaard and the Renaissance and Modern Traditions, Tome III, Literature, Drama and Aesthetics, ed. by Jon Stewart, Aldershot: Ashgate 2009 (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 5), pp. 63-76. (Danish-English)

▪ Tonny Aagaard Olesen, “Wessel: Kierkegaard’s Use of Wessel, or the Crazier the Better,” in Kierkegaard and the Renaissance and Modern Traditions, Tome III, Literature, Drama and Aesthetics, ed. by Jon Stewart, Aldershot: Ashgate 2009 (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 5), pp. 245-271. (Danish-English)

• Bjarne Troelsen, “Hans Christian Ørsted: Søren Kierkegaard and The Spirit in Nature,” in Kierkegaard and his Danish Contemporaries, Tome I, Philosophy, Politics and Social Theory, ed. by Jon Stewart, Aldershot: Ashgate 2009 (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 7), pp. 215-227. (Danish-English)

▪ Carl Henrik Koch, “Frederik Christian Sibbern: ‘the lovable, remarkable thinker, Councilor Sibbern’ and ‘the political Simple-Peter Sibbern,’ ” in Kierkegaard and his Danish Contemporaries, Tome I, Philosophy, Politics and Social Theory, ed. by Jon Stewart, Aldershot: Ashgate 2009 (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 7), pp. 229-260. (Danish-English)

▪ Carl Henrik Koch, “Peter Michael Stilling: As Successor? ‘Undeniably a Possibility,’ ” in Kierkegaard and his Danish Contemporaries, Tome I, Philosophy, Politics and Social Theory, ed. by Jon Stewart, Aldershot: Ashgate 2009 (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 7), pp. 289-301. (Danish-English)

▪ Carl Henrik Koch, “Frederik Ludvig Zeuthen: ‘I struck a light, lit a fire—now it is burning. And this ‘fire,’ Dr. Zeuthen wants to extinguish—with an ‘enema syringe,’ ” in Kierkegaard and his Danish Contemporaries, Tome I, Philosophy, Politics and Social Theory, ed. by Jon Stewart, Aldershot: Ashgate 2009 (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 7), pp. 303-317. (Danish-English)

▪ Anders Holm, “N.F.S. Grundtvig: The Matchless Prophet,” in Kierkegaard and his Danish Contemporaries, Tome II, Theology, ed. by Jon Stewart, Aldershot: Ashgate 2009 (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 7), pp. 97-152. (Danish-English)

▪ Søren Jensen, “Hans Frederik Helveg: A Receptive Grundtvigian,” in Kierkegaard and his Danish Contemporaries, Tome II, Theology, ed. by Jon Stewart, Aldershot: Ashgate 2009 (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 7), pp. 153-188. (Danish-English)

▪ Søren Jensen, “Lindberg: An Acceptable Grundtvigian,” in Kierkegaard and his Danish Contemporaries, Tome II, Theology, ed. by Jon Stewart, Aldershot: Ashgate 2009 (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 7), pp. 211-228. (Danish-English)

▪ Christian Fink Tolstrup, “Jacob Peter Mynster: A Guiding Thread in Kierkegaard’s Authorship,” in Kierkegaard and his Danish Contemporaries, Tome II, Theology, ed. by Jon Stewart, Aldershot: Ashgate 2009 (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 7), pp. 267-287. (Danish-English)

▪ Søren Jensen, “Just Henrik Voltelen Paulli: Mynster’s Son-in-Law,” in Kierkegaard and his Danish Contemporaries, Tome II, Theology, ed. by Jon Stewart, Aldershot: Ashgate 2009 (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 7), pp. 289-302. (Danish-English)

▪ Søren Jensen, “Rudelbach: Kierkegaard’s Idea of an ‘Orthodox’ Theologian,” in Kierkegaard and his Danish Contemporaries, Tome II, Theology, ed. by Jon Stewart, Aldershot: Ashgate 2009 (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 7), pp. 303-333. (Danish-English)

▪ Johnny Kondrup, “Meir Goldschmidt: The Cross-Eyed Hunchback,” in Kierkegaard and his Danish Contemporaries, Tome III, Literature, Drama and Aesthetics, ed. by Jon Stewart, Aldershot: Ashgate 2009 (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 7), pp. 105-149. (Danish-English)

▪ Kim Ravn, “Christian Molbech: Proverbs and Punctuation: The Inspiration of a Danish Philologist,” in Kierkegaard and his Danish Contemporaries, Tome III, Literature, Drama and Aesthetics, ed. by Jon Stewart, Aldershot: Ashgate 2009 (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 7), pp. 233-245. (Danish-English)

▪ Bjarne Troelsen, “Oehlenschläger: Kierkegaard and the Treasure Hunter of the Immediate,” in Kierkegaard and his Danish Contemporaries, Tome III, Literature, Drama and Aesthetics, ed. by Jon Stewart, Aldershot: Ashgate 2009 (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 7), pp. 257-273. (Danish-English)

▪ Steen Tullberg, “Denmark: The Permanent Reception—150 Years of Reading Kierkegaard,” in Kierkegaard’s International Reception, Tome I: Northern and Western Europe, ed. by Jon Stewart, Aldershot: Ashgate 2009 (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 7), pp. 3-120. (Danish-English)

▪ Safet Bektovic, “Serbia and Montenegro: Kierkegaard as a Post-Metaphysical Philosopher,” in Kierkegaard’s International Reception, Tome II: Southern, Central and Eastern Europe, ed. by Jon Stewart, Aldershot: Ashgate 2009 (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 7), pp. 319-324. (Danish-English)

▪ Niels W. Bruun, “Sallust: Kierkegaard’s Scarce Use of a Great Roman Historian,” in Kierkegaard and the Roman World, ed. by Jon Stewart, Aldershot: Ashgate 2009 (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 3), pp. 105-109. (Danish-English)

▪ Niels W. Bruun, “Seneca: Disjecta Membra in Kierkegaard’s Writings,” in Kierkegaard and the Roman World, ed. by Jon Stewart, Aldershot: Ashgate 2009 (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 3), pp. 111-124. (Danish-English)



2008


▪ Carl Henrik Koch, “Johan Ludvig Heiberg’s “Hegelian” Solution to the Free Problem,” in Johan Ludvig Heiberg. Philosopher, Littérateur, Dramaturge, and Political Thinker, edited by Jon Stewart. Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press 2008 (Danish Golden Age Studies, volume 5), pp. 5-36. (Danish-English)

▪ Tonny Aagaard Olesen, “Heiberg’s Initial Approach:The Prelude to his Critical Breakthrough,” in Johan Ludvig Heiberg. Philosopher, Littérateur, Dramaturge, and Political Thinker, edited by Jon Stewart. Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press 2008 (Danish Golden Age Studies, volume 5), pp. 289-323. (Danish-English)
 
▪ Tonny Aagaard Olesen, “Heiberg’s Critical Breakthrough in 1828: A Historical Presentation,” in Johan Ludvig Heiberg. Philosopher, Littérateur, Dramaturge, and Political Thinker, edited by Jon Stewart. Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press 2008 (Danish Golden Age Studies, volume 5), pp. 325-385. (Danish-English)

▪ Lise Busk-Jensen, “Heiberg’s View of Female Authors,” in Johan Ludvig Heiberg. Philosopher, Littérateur, Dramaturge, and Political Thinker, edited by Jon Stewart. Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press 2008 (Danish Golden Age Studies, volume 5), pp. 527-548. (Danish-English)

▪ Tonny Aagaard Olesen, “The Young Kierkegaard’s Study on Troubadours—‘with Respect to the Concept of the Romantic,’ ” in Kierkegaard and the Patristic and Medieval Traditions. Aldershot: Ashgate 2008 (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 4), pp. 299-321. (Danish-English)



2007


▪ Tonny Aagaard Olesen, “Schelling: A Historical Introduction to Kierkegaard’s Schelling,” in Kierkegaard and his German Contemporaries, Tome 1: Philosophy, edited by Jon Stewart. Aldershot: Ashgate 2007 (Kierkegaard Research: Sources, Reception and Resources, vol. 6), pp. 229-275.
 
▪ Søren Bruun and Jette Knudsen, “Critical Account of the Journal AA,” Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook, 2001, pp. 433-442. (Danish English) (Also published as “Critical Account of the Text of Journal AA,” in Kierkegaard’s Journals and Notebooks, vol. 1, Journals AA-DD, edited by Niels Jørgen Cappelørn, Alastair Hannay, David Kangas, Bruce H. Kirmmse, George Pattison, Vanessa Rumble and K. Brian Söderquist. Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2007, pp. 293-305.)

▪ Leon Jaurnow and Kim Ravn, “Critical Account of the Journal DD,” Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook, 2001, pp. 453-461. (Danish-English) (Also published as “Critical Account of the Text for Journal DD,” in Kierkegaard’s Journals and Notebooks, vol. 1, Journals AA-DD, edited by Niels Jørgen Cappelørn, Alastair Hannay, David Kangas, Bruce H. Kirmmse, George Pattison, Vanessa Rumble and K. Brian Söderquist. Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2007, pp. 479-490.)

▪ Heinrich Anz, et al., “Explanatory Notes for Journal AA,” in Kierkegaard’s Journals and Notebooks, vol. 1, Journals AA-DD, edited by Niels Jørgen Cappelørn, Alastair Hannay, David Kangas, Bruce H. Kirmmse, George Pattison, Vanessa Rumble and K. Brian Söderquist. Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2007, pp. 307-358. (Danish-English)

▪ Niels W. Bruun and Finn Gredal Jensen, “Critical Account of the Text for Journal CC,” translated by Jon Stewart and David Kangas in Kierkegaard’s Journals and Notebooks, vol. 1, Journals AA-DD, edited by Niels Jørgen Cappelørn, Alastair Hannay, David Kangas, Bruce H. Kirmmse, George Pattison, Vanessa Rumble and K. Brian Söderquist. Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2007, pp. 427-433. (Danish-English)

▪ Niels Jørgen Cappelørn, et al., “Explanatory Notes for Journal DD,” translated by Jon Stewart and K. Brian Söderquist in Kierkegaard’s Journals and Notebooks, vol. 1, Journals AA-DD, edited by Niels Jørgen Cappelørn, Alastair Hannay, David Kangas, Bruce H. Kirmmse, George Pattison, Vanessa Rumble and K. Brian Söderquist. Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2007, pp. 491-559. (Danish-English)



2000-2006


▪ Joachim Ringleben, “Søren Kierkegaard as a Reader of Hamann,” Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook, 2006, pp. 207-218. (German-English)

▪ Kim Ravn, “The Genesis of the Concluding Unscientific Postscript,” Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook, 2005, pp. 1-23. (Danish-English)

▪ Ragni Linnet, “Golden Tears: Johan Thomas Lundbye and Søren Kierkegaard,” in Kierkegaard and his Contemporaries: The Culture of Golden Age Denmark, edited by Jon Stewart. Berlin and New York: Verlag Walter de Gruyter, 2003. pp. 406-426. (Kierkegaard Studies. Monograph Series, vol. 10.) (Danish-English)

▪ Niels W. Bruun and Finn Gredal Jensen, “Kierkegaard’s Latin Translations of the New Testament in the Journal CC,” Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook, 2001, pp. 443-452. (Danish-English)

▪ Thor Arvid Dyrerud, “Søren Kierkegaard and The Concept of Anxiety in Norway,” Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook, 2001, pp. 364-377. (Norwegian-English)

Søren Bruun and Jette Knudsen, “Critical Account of the Journal AA,” Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook, 2001, pp. 433-442. (Danish-English)


Leon Jaurnow and Kim Ravn, “Critical Account of the Journal DD,” Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook, 2001, pp. 453-461. (Danish-English)


▪ Arne Grøn, “The Human Synthesis,” in Anthropology and Authority: Essays on Søren Kierkegaard, edited by Poul Houe, Gordon D. Marino and Sven Hakon Rossel. Amsterdam, Atlanta: Editions Rodopi 2000, pp. 27-32. (Danish-English)



1995-2000


▪ Povl Götke, “Works of Love in the more recent Danish Reception,” Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook, 1998, pp. 232-244. (Danish-English)

▪ Johnny Kondrup, “The Editor as Interpreter,” Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook, 1998, pp. 369-378. (Danish-English)

▪ Karlheinz Nusser, “The French Revolution in Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit,” in The Phenomenology of Spirit Reader: Critical and Interpretive Essays, edited by Jon Stewart. Albany, New York: SUNY Press, 1998, pp. 282-306. (German-English)

▪ Jean-Louis Vieillard-Baron, “Natural Religion: An Investigation of Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit,” in The Phenomenology of Spirit Reader: Critical and Interpretive Essays, edited by Jon Stewart. Albany, New York: SUNY Press, 1998, pp. 351-374. (French-English)

▪ Harald Schöndorf, S.J., “The Othering (Becoming Other) and Reconciliation of God in Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit: A Commentary on the Second Part of VII. C. ‘Revealed Religion, ’ ” in The Phenomenology of Spirit Reader: Critical and Interpretive Essays, edited by Jon Stewart. Albany, New York: SUNY Press, 1998, pp. 375-400. (German-English)

▪ Henning Ottmann, “Hegel and Political Trends. A Criticism of the Political Hegel Legends,” in The Hegel Myths and Legends, edited by Jon Stewart. Evanston, Illinois: Northwestern University Press, 1996, pp. 53-69. (German-English)

▪ Reinhart Klemens Maurer, “Hegel and the End of History,” in The Hegel Myths and Legends, edited by Jon Stewart. Evanston, Illinois: Northwestern University Press, 1996, pp. 199-222. (German-English)


▪ Franz Grégoire, “A Semi-Legend. The ‘Divinity’ of the State in Hegel,” in The Hegel Myths and Legends, edited by Jon Stewart. Evanston, Illinois: Northwestern University Press, 1996, pp. 289- 300. (French-English)

▪ Franz Grégoire, “Is the Hegelian State Totalitarian?” in The Hegel Myths and Legends, edited by Jon Stewart. Evanston, Illinois: Northwestern University Press, 1996, pp. 104-108. (French-English)

▪ Ludwig Siep, “Individuality in Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit,” in The Modern Subject: Conceptions of the Self in Classical German Idealism, edited by Karl Ameriks and Dieter Sturma.
Albany, New York: SUNY Press, 1995, pp. 131-148. (German-English)

▪ Robert Pippin, “Selbstüberwindung, Versöhnung, und Modernität bei Nietzsche und Hegel,” in Nietzsche und Hegel: Nietzsche in der Diskussion, edited by Mihailo Djuric.
Würzburg: Könighausen & Neumann, 1992, pp. 130-145. (English-German)

▪ Ludwig Siep, “Hegel’s Idea of a Conceptual Scheme,” Inquiry, vol. 34, no. 1, 1991, pp. 63-76.
(German-English)





Invited Prefaces and Introductions


• “Slowo wstepne,” translated by Bronislaw Swiderski, [Polish translation of “Preface,”] to Tozsamosci Kierkegaarda, in Principia, tome 23, 1999, pp. 8-10. [Proceedings from Søren Kierkegaard Seminar: “Og dog kan jeg ikke sige ‘jeg.’ ” Warsaw, Poland, May 20-21, 1998.]


 • “ ‘Повторение.’ Как художественное, богословское, психологическое и философское произведение,” [“Preface: Kierkegaard’s Repetition as a Literary, Theological and Philosophical Text,”], in Сёрен Керкегор [Søren Kierkegaard] Повторение, [Repetition], trans. by Darya Loungina, Moscow: Labirint 2008, pp. 5-18.


 • “Prefacio a la ediciòn en castellano” to La Unidad de la Fenomenología del espíritu de Hegel. Una interpretación sistemática, translated by Carlos Mendiola Mejía, Mexico City: Universidad Iberoamericana 2014, pp. 11-14.



    Other Publications


 

Notesbog 8. Kommentarer, by Peter Tudvad and Jon Stewart. Commentary to vol. 19 of Søren Kierkegaards Skrifter, edited by Niels Jørgen Cappelørn, Joakim Garff, Johnny Kondrup, Alastair McKinnon. Copenhagen: Gad Publishers, 2001, pp. 307-321.

Notesbog 9. Kommentarer, by Niels Jørgen Cappelørn and Jon Stewart. Commentary to vol. 19 of Søren Kierkegaards Skrifter, edited by Niels Jørgen Cappelørn, Joakim Garff, Johnny Kondrup, Alastair McKinnon. Copenhagen: Gad Publishers, 2001, pp. 331-388.

Notesbog 10. Kommentarer, by Niels Jørgen Cappelørn, Jon Stewart, Peter Tudvad. Commentary to vol. 19 of Søren Kierkegaards Skrifter, edited by Niels Jørgen Cappelørn, Joakim Garff, Johnny Kondrup, Alastair McKinnon. Copenhagen: Gad Publishers, 2001, pp. 389-412.


 

 




Jon Stewart©2007-2016